1. Click here to sign the "Publish the NICE ME/CFS Guideline Now" petition.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, the 'News in Brief' for the week beginning 13th September 2021 is here.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Welcome! To read the Core Purpose and Values of our forum, click here.
    Dismiss Notice

The [ME/CFS] Patients with Joint Hypermobility Show Larger Cerebral Blood Flow Reductions during Orthostatic Stress Testing..., 2021, van Campen et al

Discussion in 'BioMedical ME/CFS Research' started by cassava7, Jun 19, 2021.

  1. cassava7

    cassava7 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    411
    The Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients with Joint Hypermobility Show Larger Cerebral Blood Flow Reductions during Orthostatic Stress Testing Than Patients without Hypermobility: A Case Control Study

    Linda M.C. van Campen
    Stichting CardioZorg, Planetenweg 5, 2132 HN Hoofddorp, Netherlands
    Peter C Rowe, mr
    Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Frans C Visser, mr
    Stichting CardioZorg, Planetenweg 5, 2132 HN Hoofddorp, Netherlands

    Published Jun 16, 2021

    Aims: An abnormal reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during orthostatic stress is common in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), a condition with more prevalent joint hypermobility than in the healthy population. As one of proposed underlying mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance in hypermobile patients is vessel laxity, reducing the normal return of blood to the heart during orthostatic stress, we hypothesized that the CBF reduction during tilt-testing would be larger in ME/CFS patients with joint hypermobility than in patients without hypermobility.

    Methods: In this case-control study, 100 female ME/CFS cases with joint hypermobility, who had undergone tilt-testing with CBF measurements, were compared to 100 female ME/CFS patients without joint hypermobility, matched by age and disease duration.

    Results: No differences in baseline characteristics were found between groups. The hypermobile patients had significantly more postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) during tilt testing than the non-hypermobile ones. Compared to supine CBF, the degree of CBF reduction during the tilt was significantly larger in hypermobile cases than in the non-hypermobile controls: -32 (6)% vs -23 (7)% (p<0.0001) The larger CBF reduction in hypermobile patients was not only present in POTS patients: -33 (6)% vs -24 (4)%, but also in patients with a normal heart rate and blood pressure response to tilt testing: -31 (6)% vs -22 (9)%: (both p<0.0001).

    Conclusions: ME/CFS patients with joint hypermobility syndromes have larger CBF reductions during orthostatic stress testing than patients without hypermobility. This larger CBF reduction is independent of the heart rate and blood pressure results of the orthostatic stress test.

    https://esmed.org/MRA/mra/article/view/2494
     
    Michelle, mango, cfsandmore and 14 others like this.
  2. DokaGirl

    DokaGirl Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    2,461
    Thank you to these researchers.

    Interesting. I hope this research is followed up on.

    I don't know the percentage of pwME with hypermobility and without.

    I'm not sure if hypermobility can be a separate diagnosis from EDS, or it only falls under the EDS umbrella.
     
    cfsandmore, ahimsa and alktipping like this.

Share This Page