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'Pacing for people with M.E.' Action for ME booklet - revised and updated January 2020.

Discussion in 'Monitoring and pacing' started by Dolphin, Jan 23, 2020.

  1. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I went through the last version of this[ie Jan 2020]
    see post https://www.s4me.info/threads/pacin...d-and-updated-january-2020.13320/#post-232178

    and from what I have looked at in the 'new revised version' [Feb 2020] of the previous allegedly revised version it's only been tweaked a bit; the format, length and substance of it haven't really changed.

    It's late for me so I'll just jot down a couple of things.

    The point of 'pacing' is basically to try and balance your activity and rest to try and prevent yourself going into PEM.

    So I woudl start with a brief explanation of PEM.

    The broken battery analogy re what energy you have or dont have, plus you don't know how much energy there is to start with or how much is left at any given time.

    so you need to try and work that out, basically trial and error.

    Forget the 'boom and bust' cycle rubbish, if anything the 'push, crash' scenario is more apt.
    ie if you push through and ignore the warning signs you get PEM.........maybe not immediately but it will happen.

    If you keep getting PEM you're doing too much.

    Doing things that result in you spending several days completely out of action and very ill is not the best way to pace no matter how much you want to do them. This is possibly one of the hardest things to learn particularly at the beginning.

    time to go
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2020
    MEMarge, shak8, Sarah94 and 12 others like this.
  2. Invisible Woman

    Invisible Woman Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I tried to carry on looking at the pacing section. Way to seriously overcomplicate. This rule, that rule, the other rule....

    At no point is there any appreciation of the fact the the same task can take different amounts of energy at a different time of day or on different days.

    At no point (in the pacing bit) did I see any acknowledge that ME is a fluctuating illness.

    Nor did I see anything about the additional load environmental factors might have on our resources - heat, amount of light, noise..... All of these can have a huge impact.

    This is just busy work for the sake of it, in my opinion. In some ways I can understand a mild - moderate, newly diagnosed person clinging to this and even giving them feedback because rules, baselines, diaries with coloured pens might make you feel more in charge while actually achieving naff all.

    I doubt I'll read any more to be honest. It's not worth the effort.
     
    MEMarge, shak8, Sarah94 and 13 others like this.
  3. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Not exactly related to this discussion but came across this paper from Sharpe and co
    Do patients with "pure" chronic fatigue syndrome (neurasthenia) have abnormal sleep?

    https://www.psych.ox.ac.uk/publications/175855

    the findings are pretty unremarkable; it was the title that grabbed my attention.
     
  4. Lucibee

    Lucibee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Hedging. They've done this one before:
    Abnormalities of sleep in patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome. BMJ 1993
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8499816
     
  5. Lucibee

    Lucibee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Despite nearly 30 years of studies on sleep dysfunction in ME/CFS, Castro-Marrero et al. conclude that "Very little is known about the nature and cause of sleep dysfunction in CFS/ME." https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jsr.12703

    Yet others, like Lloyd et al in Australia, are quite happy to assume it might be treated with simple relaxation techniques. Their trial was registered in 2016, but has yet to report. Wonder why...

    However, Staines and Marsall-Gradisnik hypothesise that sleep dysfunction maybe due to poor brainstem connectivity: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6835065/

    It would be useful to know where exactly this notion, that correcting sleep patterns can help improve symptoms, comes from. Is it just a hypothesis, or has anyone actually reported some hard evidence?
     
    MEMarge, Milo, Sarah94 and 14 others like this.
  6. Invisible Woman

    Invisible Woman Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Based on my own experience of a sleep study (not ME specific), frankly I am not at all surprised.

    I arrived at the centre and told I had to be all connected up and in bed at a certain time - significantly earlier than my usual bedtime. A good hour earlier than that the lady who was to connect me up rushed up to me and told me she'd been looking for me as I needed to go to bed now. Hadn't anyone told me she needed to leave early? No.

    So I was rushed into bed ridiculously early. As many of you already know, going to bed too early means you're less likely to fall asleep. Heyho.

    Finally, I nod off. The nurse has to visually check every patient, every hour. The sound of her opening the door and walking into the room woke me up. Every time. Then it would take a minimum of half an hour before I could go back to sleep.

    5am the kitchens started up. My window overlooked the same courtyard as the kitchens. It sounded like a saucepan fight.

    Eventually I was freed only to discover one of the yokes hadn't been connected correctly. Wait around to find a unit to take home, but it had to be back the following day so IM had to drive a good hour out of his way on his way to work. Very grumpy.

    So that night I connect myself up. My dog was mesmerized. For the first few hours, every time I closed my eyes, I could feel him sneak up, examine me carefully then gently start to tug at the wires.

    Result? Inconclusive.
     
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  7. Lucibee

    Lucibee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  8. TheBassist

    TheBassist Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    It’s just the pig headed notion that we’re just tired.
     
  9. Sean

    Sean Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    They have been stunningly successful at it.
     
    MEMarge, rvallee, Joh and 3 others like this.
  10. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  11. Lucibee

    Lucibee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  12. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    another one that needs changing (written in 2015)
    https://www.actionforme.org.uk/uploads/managing-me-a-guide-for-gps-in-scotland.pdf
     
    Hutan and Peter Trewhitt like this.
  13. Trish

    Trish Moderator Staff Member

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  14. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    It seems AfME have adopted the #MEAction Stop,Rest, Pace message and linking to their booklet on pacing:

    https://www.actionforme.org.uk/rese...ing-for-change/international-advocacy-for-me/
     
    Yessica, Hutan, Snowdrop and 4 others like this.

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