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Functional Status and Well-Being in People with ME/CFS Compared with People with MS and Healthy Controls (2018) Kingdon and al.

Discussion in 'BioMedical ME/CFS Research' started by Cheshire, Mar 13, 2018.

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  1. Cheshire

    Cheshire Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Caroline C. Kingdon, Erinna W. Bowman, Hayley Curran, Luis Nacul, Eliana M. Lacerda

    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s41669-018-0071-6
     
  2. MErmaid

    MErmaid Guest

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  3. Cheshire

    Cheshire Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  4. Barry

    Barry Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    This clearly shows PwME to have similar mental and emotional capabilities as PwMS, but much more impaired physical and social capabilities.
     
  5. Sasha

    Sasha Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Does it, though? Wouldn't that require a large, random and therefore representative population sample of PWME to be taken, which doesn't seem to have been the case here? Ditto for the MS population (I don't know how the samples for the comparison sample were got)?
     
  6. Andy

    Andy Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Well, it shows that of the population sample that they looked at, the question of whether that can be extrapolated to a wider population is a valid one, but hasn't there been studies in the States which show similar results?
     
  7. Sasha

    Sasha Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I wonder if those studies also show a similar problem of sampling. One of our big issues is that the epidemiology on ME/CFS is pretty bad, because no one has put the money in. People seem to have done a lot of convenience sampling in ME/CFS, often centred around groups where you'd expect there to be a bias in favour of the more severely ill patients responding (such as online surveys within patients' organisations, specialist clinics, etc.).
     
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  8. Barry

    Barry Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Yes, you are right, my wording might have been better to say "This clearly shows the possibility that PwME have ..."
     
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  9. Sasha

    Sasha Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Not meant as a criticism of you, Barry! :)
     
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  10. Barry

    Barry Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    No that's fine @Sasha, I took it as a healthy critique of what I said, not of me personally :).
     
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  11. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    On recognising "the disabling effects of ME/CFS"

    The findings reported by Caroline Kingdon and colleagues [1] observing that "Using SF-36v2™ scores as a proxy, people with ME/CFS [myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome] were measurably more disabled than PWMS [people with multiple sclerosis] or HCs [healthy controls] in this study population" didn't really surprise me.

    Although I'm always a little cautious about making sweeping 'who's the more disabled' comparisons when it comes to various diseases / conditions / labels, I've previously talked about how truly quality-of-life-sapping a diagnosis of ME/CFS can be (see here). Indeed, from previous results published by Falk Hvidberg and colleagues [2] for example, the message was pretty clear: "The ME/CFS study population is more disabled and socially marginalized than the average population with regards to the subjects of long-term illness, number of illnesses, proportion of disability pensioners and relationships." Indeed on that research occasion, ME/CFS beat the likes of lung cancer, depression and schizophrenia in terms of measured severity of health-related quality of life."

    rest of article here:

    https://questioning-answers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/on-recognising-disabling-effects-of-MECFS.html
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2018

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