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Low temperature

Discussion in 'Endocrine: Thyroid, Adrenal, Diabetes' started by Wonko, Dec 31, 2017.

  1. Valentijn

    Valentijn Guest

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    Ferritin can get high due to inflammation and/or certain medical conditions. It's probably a good one to have investigated further.
     
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  2. Inara

    Inara Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I'd say a TSH of 3 is a bit too high. In Germany, the limits were changed some years ago. Now everything > 2.5 microU/ml is deemed as hypothyroidism, if I remember correctly. I also found 3,1 as upper limit. But to me, ft3 and ft4 look decent.

    Edit: You could think about substituting folate; "active B12" is confusing. I prefer holo-transcobalamin or other metabolic products, e.g. homocysteine (but not alone).
     
  3. Wonko

    Wonko Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Thank you - that prompted further checking and yes it appears that internationally TSH levels above 2.5 can be regarded as evidence of hypothyroidism.

    I've also discovered that at least one person with an internet page considers rT3 levels above 15 to be abnormal.

    I have yet to do any serious digging (i.e. enough to understand) about folate levels. * so as I have some knocking about I'll just try it for a few months or until the bottle runs out and see if that makes any difference. I've been unable to find any reference ranges for it I can make sense of.

    ETA - it also seems that a hs CRP above 3 suggests I may at "severe" risk of a cardiac event, which is odd as according to the doctors notes that came with these results he suggests that it may be a risk to my liver - and suggests giving up alcohol (they were told I don't drink), giving up smoking (ditto) and exercise (they were told I had ME), and the little status indicator on their website gives a green for it :grumpy:
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2018
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  4. erin

    erin Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Antibodies are normal, Hashimoto's is unlikely, which is good. But vitamin D is so low, really need to supplement it Wonko.
     
  5. Wonko

    Wonko Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Steps are being taken :) I should have "stuff" some point tomorrow and we'll see if I can actually take D3 without it leaving me mucked up, this time around.
     
  6. Inara

    Inara Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I would take "active folic acid" - is that folate? Ohhhh :bear: I take MTHF. Folate is one suggestion by the Charité ("things you can try").

    My feeling was that the CRP wasn't too low (but not too high either...well). Probably it's not important?
     
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  7. Wonko

    Wonko Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I'm taking it, along with the ferritin result as just an indication of "inflammation", something I already knew about but didn't have any numbers.

    It is, unfortunately, probably time to prod my GP tho.
     
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  8. Indigophoton

    Indigophoton Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Well, hope your GP is able to come up with something helpful that makes you feel a bit better :hug:
     
  9. Inara

    Inara Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Good luck with your GP, @Wonko.

    You know more now. Personally I think that's valuable and is a good foundation for success. Best wishes!
     
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  10. Amw66

    Amw66 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Good luck with finding a mercury thermometer. Digital ones seem to have replaced these. No doubt a H&S issue
     
  11. Wonko

    Wonko Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    That seems a bit unreasonable, given that the non mercury ones seem to suffer from the small flaw of not actually being very good at measuring temperature (according to amazon reviews anyway).

    But yes, I had noticed that they no longer seem to be available, even as "collectors" items on ebay.
     
  12. Amw66

    Amw66 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Unfortunately if things are within " normal ranges", GPs will not look any further. Testing is set up to look for specifics ( usually near end states), and misses associations. It seems illogical that nothing is done when repeated tests show you sliding towards one scenario - until you hit the out of range parameter. Clinical observation seems to have died a death for many aspects of conditions.

    Make a case if you have other established symptoms - ( the weirdest one for hypothryroidism being loss of outer third of eyebrows - i would love to know the mechanism behind that). Having a low energy condition will/ should impact on the interpretation of test results- you are clearly not functioning in any " normal capacity", wny are you being compared to "normal" people if there is a well known HPA axis issue.
    Thyroid hormones can activate the uncoupling of OXPHOS via mechanisms involving inner membrane proteins an lipids- there are links between mitochondrial proton leak mechanisms, ROS production and thyroid status

    metabolic dysfunction could explain many issues where low ATP and Mg affects cellular pump action ( needed for TH formation.. glucuronidation action to get it out of cells ......) You also need specific compounds to make the different thyroid hormones - TSH needs B12, zinc. T4 needs iodine, vit B2 and vit C, T4 to T3 is a selenium dependent process, and T3 needs vit D and vit A to activate cell receptor. Significant deficiencies in these compounds may effect parts of the process.

    I have not done biology since 2nd year in school ( I preferred the joy of crashing ticker tape experiments in physics), but some of this seems a bit obvious? Or am I simply fulfilling that neurotic woman role again?
     
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  13. Amw66

    Amw66 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    High ferritin can impact liver and heart via ferritin/ GGT - first bit of video
     
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  14. Wonko

    Wonko Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    At the moment I'm just trying to build a picture of what the various results could suggest, symptom matching with my life etc., with a largely non functional brain that has the same retention capability as a sieve.

    One that does strike me is that have had bone pain for at least 20 years, which is apparently a symptom of low D3, mainly in my lower legs and forearms, so I "may" have been low for a while.

    The ferritin thing, my reading suggests ferritin should be inside cells, and only tends to leave when the cell is damaged or dies, could this be related to the the stiff red blood cell thing I've seen knocking about recently, RBC's getting damaged coz they are too stiff to get where they should. Iron is allegedly a neurotoxin, could this be responsible, at least partially, for my cognitive issues, motor control issues etc.

    More...that I can't remember right now, I just remember these were more things.

    ETA - I'm not expecting anyone to answer, anything, I'm just musing, on the record lol

    ETA again - I'm also seeing a link, but only in some symptom lists, between very low D3 (and maybe very high ferritin, think so but, as I said above, my memory..) and insulin resistance. It never made sense to me why I would become a type 2 diabetic, my weight, whilst higher than it should be was never seriously heavy, no family history, never really eaten high sugar, sweets, cake etc. my only major carb intakes were bread, potatoes and rice, and then not typically in excess.

    @Amw66 video doesn't play :(
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2018
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  15. Amw66

    Amw66 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Link to page with video. First video near start has GGT / Ferritin info.
    There is also a very good vitamin D video on this website.
    http://www.thefatemperor.com/blog/
     
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  16. Wonko

    Wonko Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Some, but only some, of what he says matches conclusions I came to several years ago, mainly the stuff about diet. But even when I've had success, dropping meds and using diet alone, my GP has been adamant that my approach (of reducing insulin resistance by reducing my intake insulin provoking foods, that eventually this would restore insulin sensitivity and at the very least lead to a reduction in my weight, which should help in its own right), is totally wrong, and that I should instead take tablets to increase insulin production by various parts of my body.
     
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  17. Arnie Pye

    Arnie Pye Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Wonko, you sound much better informed about insulin resistance and diabetes than your GP!
     
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  18. Amw66

    Amw66 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Unfortunate it' s a bit like this illness- goes against what they have been told for so long
     
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  19. wastwater

    wastwater Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Low temperature is linked to hypothyroidism usually,but not for me.
     
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  20. Amw66

    Amw66 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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