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Autoimmunity Reviews: Dampness and mold hypersensitivity syndrome and vaccination as risk factors for CFS (Tamara Tuuminen et al - 2018)

Discussion in 'BioMedical ME/CFS Research' started by Kalliope, Nov 10, 2018.

  1. Kalliope

    Kalliope Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Last edited: Nov 10, 2018
  2. Manganus

    Manganus Established Member (Voting Rights)

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    I'm returning to reading some other papers by Tamara Tuuminen.
    It seems to me as if the Finns have had a longstanding interest in moulds and mycotoxins. Already some 15-20 years ago, I had a sister-in-law working for a Finnish firm that made their living on investigating mould infestions in buildings. They weren't interested in humans. But they were, as humans, pretty good at identifying the different smells of different kinds of moulds.
     
  3. Lisa108

    Lisa108 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    andypants and Kalliope like this.
  4. Creek

    Creek Established Member

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    Just got this test result on my daughter: extreme infection with ochratoxin. I'll be very grateful for advice from experienced mold warriors. Screen Shot 2018-12-19 at 9.29.21 AM.png Screen Shot 2018-12-19 at 9.29.21 AM.png
     
  5. Creek

    Creek Established Member

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    This link isn't working for me. Anyone else able to read it? Got a link to the full study?
     
  6. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Ochratoxin is not an infection. It is a protein produced b various moulds. This look like a urine sample. Is it certain that this is not just mould contamination of the sample?

    Where does the test result come from?
     
  7. Creek

    Creek Established Member

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    Yeah, I knew while I was typing the word, and meaning to use it in a broad sense, that someone was going to call me on "infection." Infestation? Mycotoxicity? My foggy brain couldn't find the right word.

    Anyway... Yes, it was a urine sample taken after a 14-day course of glucosamine. The sample was used to run this test from Great Plains Lab. Could it have been contaminated? I suppose it's impossible to be certain that it wasn't, but my daughter opened a sterile specimen jar, peed in it, and put the lid on it, then we put it in the freezer, so if it did get contaminated then there must be high levels of ochratoxin in, what, her breath, or the air? Based on her severe illness and the test results I think it's reasonable to suppose that the doctor might be right, and that she would maybe feel a whole lot better after a detox.
     
  8. Hip

    Hip Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    In this strong critique of Dr Joseph Brewer's work by Dr Ritchie Shoemaker, there is a paragraph about urine testing of mycotoxins:
    I don't really have any understanding of this subject, so am not sure if this is relevant.
     
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  9. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Mould spores are present in air everywhere and mould will grow in urine at low temperatures. Which is why things in the fridge often sprout furry mould colonies. I don't have any information on the value of urine mood tests other than the quote in Hip's post but from what I was taught in bacteriology years ago I would assume that it is completely meaningless.
     
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  10. Hip

    Hip Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Dr Joseph Brewer's 2013 study found ochratoxin A in the urine of 83% of ME/CFS patients (and also found two other mycotoxins present in some ME/CFS patients: aflatoxins and macrocyclic trichothecenes).

    No such mycotoxins were found in the urine of 55 control subjects (but these controls were from another study; Brewer himself did not submit any control urine samples for testing).

    Brewer suggests that there must be an actual mold infection in the body somewhere (he proposes the nasal cavities and sinuses) that is continually producing these mycotoxins found in urine.



    Dr Brewer has experimented with treating ME/CFS patients with antifungal nasal sprays in an attempt to kill this assumed mold infection of the nasal and sinus mucous membranes.

    As you can see from the comments in Shoemaker's critique, one Lyme (or perhaps ME/CFS) patient obtained major benefits when applying those antifungal nasal sprays.

    And Dr Brewer's 2015 paper showed that approximately 60% of his patients with chronic illnesses (not necessarily ME/CFS) make a substantial improvement on this nasal spray protocol. It's interesting that Brewer found "urine mycotoxin levels decreased substantially in patients that improved on therapy."

    A blog article about his treatment protocol here.

    These antifungal nasal sprays are for sale at Woodland Hills Pharmacy. Apparently the nystatin nasal spray or itraconazole nasal spray cause less sensitivity issues than the amphotericin B spray.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2018

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