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Which computer for someone with Parkinson's Disease

Discussion in 'Lifestyle Management' started by ladycatlover, Jan 23, 2020.

  1. ladycatlover

    ladycatlover Moderator Staff Member

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    https://www.theguardian.com/technol...is-the-best-pc-for-someone-who-has-parkinsons

    I thought some of the suggestions and advice on this article might be useful for ME/CFS patients.

    While I have a laptop so I can take it to and fro from home and caravan, I use wireless keyboard and mouse with it. After reading this article I'm inclined to think about doing things differently, though it's complicated to even begin thinking about it. :rolleyes:

    Anyway, I think it's worth a read. After all, a lot of the problems we have are somewhat similar to people with Parkinson's Disease.
     
    Gigi300, inox, Peter Trewhitt and 6 others like this.
  2. alktipping

    alktipping Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    would text to speech be a better option for many as using keyboards is exhausting and painful. meant speech to text .
     
  3. Kitty

    Kitty Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I found speech to text much more tiring than typing, specially as the applications seem to be trained mainly to understand American accents. (These are somewhat thin on the ground in the part of Yorkshire where I was born!)

    It takes so long to keep repeating the phrase until the software's picked it up, and then to correct all the mistakes, that typing just seems easier – at least for people who can sit up some of the time. I realise this won't apply to everyone, though.
     
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  4. Wonko

    Wonko Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    For me speech is cognitively much more demanding than typing, and harder to edit, which is a frequent requirement.

    I was not impressed by the article.

    My solution is a moderately powerful, but quite small, system using a TV as a monitor, and both wireless and bluetooth keyboards, mice and a trackball. This can be used lying down, and mainly is.

    I also use tablets, and have a laptop, and the bedroom has a similar but less powerful setup to the living room using a mini pc and a TV.

    The laptop is hardly ever used, mainly due to the size of the display.
     
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  5. Webdog

    Webdog Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Decent article.

    However, a desktop may be less practical for those who spend periods bedbound. I think ME/CFS is less "one size fits all" than most disabling chronic illnesses. Every situation can be unique.

    A laptop which can be hooked up to an external monitor and keyboard at the desk, but also used solo while bedbound might be a working solution for some. Or a desktop when non-bedbound, and a phone when bedbound. Whatever works.

    While it keeps the suggestions focused, the article does seem pretty stuck on Windows 10. But there are other good OS options out there.

    Would have liked to see tablet solutions mentioned too. Some of the more severe can be physically limited to managing a tablet or phone.
     
    alktipping, Gigi300, Kitty and 3 others like this.
  6. Peter Trewhitt

    Peter Trewhitt Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    There are specialist assistive technology services that in theory could be very useful for some people with ME. This would range from supporting computer access to fitting environmental controls. There are an enormous number of options, be it just providing a custom made armrest to position your hand over a computer keyboard, or controlling a computer with minimal movements, or a door lock control and intercom control from you bed or arm chair.

    Here in the UK service provision varies from area to area, as there is no national guidance on funding. It is down to historical accident whether particular areas have well developed services or not. Some services rely only on existing commercial products, etc whereas others have access to medical physics/engineering input enabling custom made adaptations. In the UK these services are usually hosted within the NHS. My knowledge is twenty years out of date, but a quick web search suggests things are not that different now.

    There are some regional centres, but with an awareness some people are unable to travel to a centre. Also in some districts there are looser associations of various professionals working in the field. Where there is a specific centre people could contact them directly to discuss there referral procedures, but where provision is through other services it may be harder to find a way in. It may also be that OTs could provide an way into specialist services, but I imagine the knowledge of a lot of OTs in relation to this is quite patchy.

    This is something that the specialist ME/CFS services could provide an in to, but given they almost universally ignore more severe patients they probably do not in general recognise any need. In other conditions, such as MND (ALS), there are charities that provide support workers that are knowledgable on their local service provision and even have access to their own equipment libraries.

    There is a real need for a pooling of knowledge relating to the sorts of things that might help us in general, through to support in deciding when an individual would benefit from accessing a specialist service.
     
    alktipping, Gigi300, Kitty and 4 others like this.
  7. NelliePledge

    NelliePledge Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes I’m better writing and editing my own text than trying to dictate. Interestingly I had a job years ago where I went from typing my own stuff to a team where they used dictation and a typist. I had to write it out then read it as I couldn’t do it in my head without seeing the words written down so it’s not necessarily an ME thing unless it is and I had very mild ME 5 years longer than I reckon my gradual onset started.
     
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  8. Kitty

    Kitty Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Me too! Most people learn to compose written work in childhood, without really being aware of how long it takes to learn to do it at reasonable speed. Dictation is every bit as much of a skill, and I think anyone who's not used to doing it would struggle to compose more than a sentence or two without practice. Brain fog makes it much harder!
     
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