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The New Yorker: The Neuroscience of Pain

Discussion in 'Health News and Research unrelated to ME/CFS' started by Andy, Jun 26, 2018.

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  1. Andy

    Andy Committee Member & Outreach

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    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/07/02/the-neuroscience-of-pain
     
  2. shak8

    shak8 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  3. Trish

    Trish Moderator Staff Member

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    I've just skim read the article. I must have missed the bit about testing a compound. Can you point to it?

    I thought the part about chronic pain being different from acute pain was interesting.
     
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  4. duncan

    duncan Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I'm not clear on how using an MRI to try to qualify pain would be any more successful than using an MRI to measure IQ. MRIs will demonstrate activity in both, but qualifying discrete levels may be a ways off. 54-Tesla or such...
     
  5. Arnie Pye

    Arnie Pye Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    The implication from that article is that chronic pain cannot (currently) be cured, because it is no longer really "physical", but instead arises from the brain.

    I had chronic pain lasting 30 years which was then 90% reduced by a skilled surgeon, and the fix has so far lasted about 15 years. If the chronic pain was arising from my brain how did surgery ever reduce it?
     
  6. ScottTriGuy

    ScottTriGuy Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Placebo effect of course. ;)
     
  7. Woolie

    Woolie Committee member

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    So many inferences made from fMRI data are problematic. But isn't it good to know that we are making those problematic inferences based on the most expensive, high resolution scanner available. That's a great comfort.
     
  8. TrixieStix

    TrixieStix Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Great article. Really interesting stuff.

    I sure hope the volunteers who participate in these experiments (especially the one outlined in the excerpt below) are well compensated. Eeek!

    "Inflatable rectal balloons mimic the distinctive pain caused by damage to internal organs."
     
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  9. Arnie Pye

    Arnie Pye Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    The surgeon who got it right was the second one to have a go. The first one failed. Perhaps the placebo effect depends on the skill of the surgeon. :) ;)
     
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  10. Wonko

    Wonko Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    or on the perceived skill of the surgeon :nailbiting:
     
  11. Arnie Pye

    Arnie Pye Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    This is all getting too complicated for me now!
     
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