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Spanish flu: the killer that still stalks us, 100 years on

Discussion in 'Health News and Research unrelated to ME/CFS' started by hinterland, Sep 9, 2018.

  1. hinterland

    hinterland Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2...tenary-first-world-war?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

     
  2. JohnTheJack

    JohnTheJack Moderator Staff Member

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  3. chrisb

    chrisb Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    It is astonishing that all those nurses, in the photograph with the article, did not suffer a hysterical response ( or should that be a mass hysterical response), caused by the risks of nursing that potentially fatal illness, and believe themselves to be suffering from the same disease. Perhaps psychiatry can explain why they were so much more psychologically robust.
     
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  4. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    A good point but surely when they caught the flu they would have realised they had flu, and so would the doctors. So they just carried on as normal, having flu.
     
  5. chrisb

    chrisb Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Certainly, but this was an unusual variant leading to high mortality. Why would not the serious risk of contracting a highly infectious, often fatal, illness induce a hysterical reaction in a young suggestible and apprehensive group, if that was the reaction in the case of a less infectious illness with lower mortality.
     
  6. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Because in the case of flu the doctors said - oh it's bad flu. So people coped as best they could, knowing what was wrong.

    For the Royal Free situation the doctor said 'golly this looks like some weird neurological illness that we have never seen before - what could it be!!!?'

    So it was all the doctors' fault if it was anyone's 'fault', I would suggest.
     
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  7. Daisymay

    Daisymay Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Well perhaps the nurses were actually men in drag, hence immune to hysteria.
     
  8. Mithriel

    Mithriel Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Being female is not a risk factor for becoming hysterical and developing symptoms of disease. It is an idea that became embedded in medicine in mysogenistic days when women were seen as the weaker sex with weak suggestible brains and otherwise decent doctors believe it is true with no evidence because it was presented to them as fact. I argued with my GP, a very good, kind doctor but he was not convinced. A paediatric psychiatrist on the other hand, who knew more about it, was quite clear that while the mind may have a small influence he would be very reluctant to attribute serious illness to thoughts alone.

    The thread "https://www.s4me.info/threads/what-...he-past-but-were-later-proven-not-to-be.2129/" has copies of what was written about women who had MS and RA.

    Throughout history women have got on with life while men were busy building careers and believing they were superior.
     
  9. Little Bluestem

    Little Bluestem Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    You forgot 'female'. ;)
     
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