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Persistent clotting protein pathology in Long COVID/PASC is accompanied by increased levels of antiplasmin, 2021, Pretorius et al

Discussion in 'Long Covid research' started by Sly Saint, Oct 5, 2021.

  1. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    UK
    "
    Inflammatory micro clots in blood of individuals suffering from Long COVID
    Date:
    October 4, 2021
    Source:
    Stellenbosch University
    Summary:
    Researchers have found an overload of various inflammatory molecules, 'trapped' inside insoluble microscopic blood clots (micro clots), in the blood of individuals suffering from Long COVID."
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/10/211004104134.htm

    eta:
    Is this what's behind long Covid? Sufferers have 'micro blood clots' that may stop oxygen flowing around the body properly
     
    Lidia, Yvonne, Starlight and 12 others like this.
  2. Hutan

    Hutan Moderator Staff Member

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    20,496
    Location:
    Aotearoa New Zealand
    https://cardiab.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12933-021-01359-7
    Open Access


    Persistent clotting protein pathology in Long COVID/Post-Acute Sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC) is accompanied by increased levels of antiplasmin


    Background
    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2)-induced infection, the cause of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is characterized by acute clinical pathologies, including various coagulopathies that may be accompanied by hypercoagulation and platelet hyperactivation. Recently, a new COVID-19 phenotype has been noted in patients after they have ostensibly recovered from acute COVID-19 symptoms. This new syndrome is commonly termed Long COVID/Post-Acute Sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC). Here we refer to it as Long COVID/PASC.

    Lingering symptoms persist for as much as 6 months (or longer) after acute infection, where COVID-19 survivors complain of recurring fatigue or muscle weakness, being out of breath, sleep difficulties, and anxiety or depression. Given that blood clots can block microcapillaries and thereby inhibit oxygen exchange, we here investigate if the lingering symptoms that individuals with Long COVID/PASC manifest might be due to the presence of persistent circulating plasma microclots that are resistant to fibrinolysis.

    Methods
    We use techniques including proteomics and fluorescence microscopy to study plasma samples from healthy individuals, individuals with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), with acute COVID-19, and those with Long COVID/PASC symptoms.

    Results
    We show that plasma samples from Long COVID/PASC still contain large anomalous (amyloid) deposits (microclots). We also show that these microclots in both acute COVID-19 and Long COVID/PASC plasma samples are resistant to fibrinolysis (compared to plasma from controls and T2DM), even after trypsinisation. After a second trypsinization, the persistent pellet deposits (microclots) were solubilized.

    We detected various inflammatory molecules that are substantially increased in both the supernatant and trapped in the solubilized pellet deposits of acute COVID-19 and Long COVID/PASC, versus the equivalent volume of fully digested fluid of the control samples and T2DM. Of particular interest was a substantial increase in α(2)-antiplasmin (α2AP), various fibrinogen chains, as well as Serum Amyloid A (SAA) that were trapped in the solubilized fibrinolytic-resistant pellet deposits.

    Conclusions
    Clotting pathologies in both acute COVID-19 infection and in Long COVID/PASC might benefit from following a regime of continued anticlotting therapy to support the fibrinolytic system function.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2021
  3. Mithriel

    Mithriel Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    2,689
    I vaguely remember research that suggested ME could be helped by anticlotting drugs but can't think of the details.
     
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  4. Chestnut tree

    Chestnut tree Established Member (Voting Rights)

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    Interesting study would like to know if results would also apply to ME

    Edit: typo
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2021
  5. Mij

    Mij Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    It was a theory from 1999 that pwME and now pwLyme and MCAS (add on more) were/are in a hypercoagulative (thick blood) state where injecting heparin dissolves fibrin.

    So the theory goes that a hypercoagulable state starves cells of oxygen and nutrients.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2021
    Lidia, Yvonne, Binkie4 and 10 others like this.
  6. Fizzlou

    Fizzlou Established Member (Voting Rights)

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    @Adam pwme posted video clip of Dr Asad Khan BBC interview on Apheresis and microclots.

    (Apologies not a good day but I have some questions)

    Am I posting a relevant/best thread?
    Is venous oxygen saturation testing he mentioned easy to do. Any ME studies use this measure?
    This is H.E.L.P Apheresis? Only available Germany?
    What is the assessment/opinion of the level of effective collaboration in any direction MECFS-LC?
     
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  7. Chestnut tree

    Chestnut tree Established Member (Voting Rights)

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    Also interesting from the BBC clip of dr Assad Khan was that the clots were not picked up by tests such as fibrin and d-dimer.
     
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  8. Kitty

    Kitty Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I think it needs a venous catheter? I remember a relative having one during his treatment. It's presumably fairly routine in hospitals when monitoring some conditions, but it's invasive, so I doubt it's something a local clinic would offer.
     
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  9. Robert 1973

    Robert 1973 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Yvonne, sebaaa, Binkie4 and 8 others like this.
  10. Skycloud

    Skycloud Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Edit - removed unnecessary section (brain fail)

    In the clip above of Dr Khan on BBC news he says that “a simple bedside test called a venous oxygen saturation can demonstrate how ill we are”

    For those like me who don’t know what that is: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK564395/
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2021
    Yvonne, sebaaa, Binkie4 and 6 others like this.
  11. ME/CFS Skeptic

    ME/CFS Skeptic Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Yvonne, sebaaa, Binkie4 and 14 others like this.
  12. Adam pwme

    Adam pwme Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    This may be of interest. Comment posted on the YouTube video. Link to the paper below.
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10695770/
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 23, 2021
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  13. Fizzlou

    Fizzlou Established Member (Voting Rights)

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  14. Kitty

    Kitty Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    You know those air fresheners in public buildings that are triggered by opening the door to the toilets?

    Every time the door of the staffroom is opened in one of the fatigue clinics, it should trigger a recording of Dr Khan's "It is a myth" statement.
     
    Milo, Yvonne, sebaaa and 10 others like this.
  15. Mij

    Mij Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    These tests were done through David Berg HEMEX labs. I had this test done and so did many others w ME/CFS back in the late nineties. None of us had antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. None.
     
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  16. Sasha

    Sasha Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Isn't apheresis a treatment that you have to have repeatedly?
     
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  17. strategist

    strategist Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    This looks interesting. I remember reading years ago about a patient with ME/CFS who figured out he really had some sort of clotting problem. It would not be surprising if this was a subset of ME/CFS, now also appearing in long covid (perhaps more prominently due to specific effects of the SARS-2 virus).
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2021
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  18. Kitty

    Kitty Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    They're saying 'a version of APS syndrome', which I suppose could mean something that is not APS but produces similar effects? It's not a very satisfactory way of expressing it, though, even assuming they know what they mean in the first place.
     
  19. Mij

    Mij Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    @Kitty

    I also had an ISAC (Immune System Activation of Coagulation) panel done which is most likely a 'version' of APS.

    This is recycling pet theories all over again.
     
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  20. Kitty

    Kitty Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    If you can't remove the cause of the sticky blood, then I guess yes? But if it actually worked, it would provide a target for further research. And once a lot of the gunk has been filtered out, treatment with existing drugs might help delay its return.
     
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