1. Guest, the two part 'News in Brief' for the week beginning 5th April 2021 is here.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Welcome! To read the Core Purpose and Values of our forum, click here.
    Dismiss Notice

Pale rider: the Spanish flu and how it changed the world, 2020, Spinney

Discussion in 'Epidemics (including Covid-19)' started by Tom Kindlon, Oct 7, 2020.

  1. Tom Kindlon

    Tom Kindlon Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    1,519
    Likes Received:
    14,488
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2020
    Michelle, andypants, Joh and 13 others like this.
  2. Trish

    Trish Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    31,596
    Likes Received:
    149,961
    Location:
    UK
    The link to the article doesn't seem to work, @Tom Kindlon.
     
    alktipping, Andy and NelliePledge like this.
  3. Tom Kindlon

    Tom Kindlon Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    1,519
    Likes Received:
    14,488
    Thanks for letting me know; I have now added in an alternative link.
     
    Andy, Amw66 and Trish like this.
  4. Hutan

    Hutan Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    13,055
    Likes Received:
    53,665
    Location:
    New Zealand
    The link is to a book review of this book:
    Screen Shot 2020-10-08 at 11.06.41 AM.png

    Murthy, the reviewer, concludes:
    All good things to do, but the assumption on the part of the reviewer is that there will be a mental (ill-)health tsunami, rather than, or alongside, a tsunami of post-infectious physical ill-health.
     
    Michelle, alktipping, rvallee and 4 others like this.
  5. Michiel Tack

    Michiel Tack Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    2,259
    Likes Received:
    21,898
    Location:
    Belgium
    Would be interesting to retrieve the text where Mamelund makes this hypothesis.

    Here's his Researchgate profile and list of publications: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Svenn_Erik_Mamelund/publications

    I've found this text from 2003: 'Effects of the Spanish Influenza Pandemic of 1918-19 on Later Life Mortality of Norwegian Cohorts Born About 1900'. It reads:
    Unfortunately, the reference Mamelund 1998 refers to his PhD thesis in Norwegian.

    Other articles cite this paper by Mamelund: "Mamelund SE. The Impact of Influenza on Mental Health in Norway, 1872-1929. Workshop. May 2010. Carlsberg Academy, Copenhagen, Denmark. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/7276/25455394eab84386133b95cc97909017213f.pdf. Accessed March 24, 2020."

    But I can't see to find a text of this either.
    EDIT: just found the text here but it's simply a short abstract: http://misms.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/CPH_abstracts.pdf
     
    Michelle, ukxmrv, ScottTriGuy and 5 others like this.
  6. Aslaug

    Aslaug Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    770
    Likes Received:
    4,348
    Surprisingly for this type of research you would probably still be allowed to write in Norwegian for a thesis or paper, as it is a local population and it could be argued "not relevant to other countries". Could be some interesting points in the thesis :)
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2020
    Michelle and Peter Trewhitt like this.
  7. Michiel Tack

    Michiel Tack Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    2,259
    Likes Received:
    21,898
    Location:
    Belgium
    If only we knew someone who speaks Norwegian...
     
    ukxmrv likes this.
  8. Aslaug

    Aslaug Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    770
    Likes Received:
    4,348
    I looked up the 1998 thesis, in chapter 3.7 he writes about "Complications and post-viral illness" (hastily translated by me):

    His sources:
    Collier, R (1974): The Plague of the Spanish Lady. The influenza Pandemic of 1918-1919. Macmillan.
    Det civile medisinalvesen (1922): Sundhetstilstanden of medisinalforholdene 1918, NOS VIL.58.
    Galowsky, E (1919): Haaravfald etter influenza. Tidsskrift for Den Norske Lægeforening. 39(13): 531-532.
    MAttock, C., Marmot, M. and G. Stern (1988): Could Parkinson's disease follow intra-uterine influenza?: a speculative hypothesis. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. 51.735-736.
    Ravenholt, R.T. and W.H. Foege (1982): Before our time. 1918 influenza, Encephalities Lethargica, Parkinsonism. The Lancet, 16 Oct., pp. 860-864.

    At least in this chapter he does not include a source for the statement that people were not able to do tasks of daily living or work for months (years is not mentioned). It may be it's written somewhere else, but this chapter seemed the most likely based on the title ;) Unfortunately the document seemed to be scanned and I am unable to search through it. Potential long-term problems following the illness is not important enough to be part of the conclusion and what future research should focus on.
     
    Michelle, andypants, ukxmrv and 10 others like this.
  9. Michiel Tack

    Michiel Tack Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    2,259
    Likes Received:
    21,898
    Location:
    Belgium
    Thanks!
     
    ukxmrv likes this.
  10. rvallee

    rvallee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    5,929
    Likes Received:
    48,032
    Location:
    Canada
    Lost their hair is particularly interesting considering how often it happens with Covid.
     
    Michelle, andypants and Tom Kindlon like this.

Share This Page