Once again, the PACE authors respond to concerns with empty answers, 2017, Tuller

Discussion in 'Psychosomatic research - ME/CFS and Long Covid' started by MSEsperanza, Feb 20, 2022.

  1. MSEsperanza

    MSEsperanza Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Tuller D. Once again, the PACE authors respond to concerns with empty answers. Journal of Health Psychology. 2017;22(9):1118-1122. doi:10.1177/1359105317703788

    Abstract

    In their response to Geraghty, the PACE investigators state that they have “repeatedly addressed” the various methodological concerns raised about the trial.

    While this is true, these responses have repeatedly failed to provide satisfactory explanations for the trial’s very serious flaws.

    This commentary examines how the current response once again demonstrates the ways in which the investigators avoid acknowledging the obvious problems with PACE and offer non-answers instead—arguments that fall apart quickly under scrutiny.

    (This is a commnentary on: White PD, Chalder T, Sharpe M, et al. Response to the editorial by Dr Geraghty. Journal of Health Psychology. 2017;22(9):1113-1117. doi:10.1177/1359105316688953 )
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2022
  2. MSEsperanza

    MSEsperanza Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    The table of contents of the Journal of Health Psychology's 2017 Special Issue on the PACE trial is linked in the S4ME Science Library.

    I thought it's worthwhile to post some of these articles on the forum so they're easier to find for people new to the topic.

    I also found it worth to re-read them in the light of some individuals' and Royal Colleges' weird reaction to the new NICE guidelines on ME/CFS.

    See also:
    Edwards J. PACE team response shows a disregard for the principles of science. Journal of Health Psychology. 2017;22(9):1155-1158. doi:10.1177/1359105317700886

    Thread here
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2022
  3. MSEsperanza

    MSEsperanza Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    From the response by the PACE team:

    "We stand firmly by the findings of the PACE trial, which, along with other studies, provide patients, healthcare professionals, and commissioners with the best evidence that both CBT and GET are safe and effective treatments for this chronic and disabling illness. Others share this view (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, 2011; NHS Choices, 2011; The Lancet, 2011, 2015).

    "These findings are good news for patients who, in our experience, just want to get better. Of course, we need further trials, not only of CBT and GET but also other treatments. To this end, we hope that editorials such as that by Dr Geraghty do not discourage others from doing such research."

    The references to those "who share this view" are:

    1) National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, 2011
    = Review of Clinical Guideline (CG53) – Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (or encephalopathy): Diagnosis and management of chronic fatigue syndrome, myalgic encephalomyelitis (or encephalopathy) in adults and children. Available at: https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg53/evidence/review-decision-2011-546258781

    The link now refers to the updated guideline: "This guideline has been updated and replaced by NICE guideline NG206."

    2) NHS Choices, 2011
    = NHS Choices (2011) Therapies ‘moderately improve’ CFS. Available at: http://www.nhs.uk/news/2011/02February/Pages/therapies-moderately-improve-CFS.aspx

    Link doesn't work for me. Perhaps works only within the UK?

    The other two references are editorials from The Lancet, the journal that published the PACE trial. No author name so presumably by the editor, Richard Horton?

    3) The Lancet (2011) Editorial: Patients’ power and PACE. The Lancet 377(9780): 1808.
    DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60696-X

    4) The Lancet (2015) Editorial: What’s in a name? Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease 385(9969): 663. DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(15)60270-7
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2022
    Binkie4, Peter Trewhitt and Wonko like this.
  4. Wonko

    Wonko Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Link 2 does not work in the UK.
     
  5. rvallee

    rvallee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Uh, never noticed that. Still they keep saying the old trope about how it's because we don't want to get better. They can say one thing and its opposite and no one but us even care. Whatever is useful at the time.

    But then that's why they invented the trope of activists who aren't patients. Or whatever, always what's convenient at the time.
     
  6. SNT Gatchaman

    SNT Gatchaman Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Just having a look through some of this earlier work.

    I love this bit, though I'm sure it's been noted elsewhere in the forum archives. As it's logically impossible to rate any differently to t0 at t0, it reduces down to "no patient can be regarded as recovered at entry because they weren't at entry." Or more simply: "no patient can be regarded as recovered at entry."
     

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