1. Guest, the 'News in Brief' for the week beginning 25th May 2020 is here.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Welcome! To read the Core Purpose and Values of our forum, click here.
    Dismiss Notice

How should medical journals deal with errors?

Discussion in 'General Advocacy Discussions' started by Sly Saint, Aug 5, 2019.

  1. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    4,562
    Likes Received:
    38,166
    Location:
    UK
    [​IMG]

    From 2012
    this next bit is rather ironic to say the least

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3284292/


    From July 2019:
    Fixing Errors in a Published Paper: Tips for Authors

    What Constitutes an Error?

    Journals’ Response to Errors
    Do the Right Thing
    full article here:
    https://www.enago.com/academy/handling-errors-published-paper-tips-authors/
     
  2. Guest 77

    Guest 77 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    1,403
    Likes Received:
    8,878
    I will update on the progress of my request for errata/corrigenda for the Peter Denton White paper, to which PDW and key WHO/ICD-11 team members have been copied in, when there has been a significant development.

    I received several emails yesterday from the Regional Editor, UK & Europe and the new Editor-in-Chief of JECP.
     
    Simbindi, Samuel, alktipping and 15 others like this.
  3. rvallee

    rvallee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    3,678
    Likes Received:
    27,711
    Location:
    Canada
    What this spells is people in charge are aware of the problems and the solutions to those problems but simply choose not to because...

    Would be interesting to know what follows that sentence. Why is nothing being done about it? Money, most likely, but still. Seriously bizarre considering the people who reject any call for change may themselves, or their family, be hurt by those mistakes. It's doing the wrong thing for the wrong reasons. Very myopic.

    Pretty similar to all the fluff over patient engagement when in practice it's systematically rejected. Almost everyone becomes a patient eventually and it's almost universal for medical professionals to find themselves on the wrong end of the massive power asymmetry and realize how completely broken and despair-inducing it is.
     

Share This Page