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Editorial: Autonomic markers, chronic fatigue syndrome, and post-exertion states, 2019, Friedberg

Discussion in 'BioMedical ME/CFS Research' started by Andy, Nov 11, 2019.

  1. Andy

    Andy Committee Member & Outreach

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    Paywall, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0022399919309055
    Scihub, https://sci-hub.se/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2019.109845
     
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  2. Marco

    Marco Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Seems like a reasonable idea although I doubt there's anything unique to find.
     
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  3. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    The problem with measures of HRV is they are quite non-specific. A lack of fitness in general is a strong predictor of lower HRV. Sleep disruption and other factors can also alter HRV as discussed in the editorial.

    The findings (across more than a handful of studies I have seen) tend to show lower HF, rather than a reduction in LF influence, which suggests lower parasympathetic activity, rather than increased sympathetic activity which lends further weight to the hypothesis that the HRV findings are primarily due to lower fitness/activity levels.

    I agree. There have been a small number of studies already that have not found anything specific, likely due to significant within-group variation.

    Friedburg cites the 'sustained arousal' model, but fails to note that the findings of higher catecholamines has only been found in adolescents by one research group and may reflect the social context of the testing (of ill adolescents), rather than be a generalised finding. Notably, this finding has not been replicated in adults.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2019
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