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Cognition, Emotion, and the Bladder: Psychosocial Factors in Bladder Pain Syndrome and Interstitial Cystitis (BPS/IC):Windgassen, McKernan - Jan 2020

Discussion in 'Health News and Research unrelated to ME/CFS' started by Sly Saint, Feb 13, 2020.

  1. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    https://link.springer.com/article/1...ArticleAuthorContributingOnlineFirst_20200201
     
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  2. Invisible Woman

    Invisible Woman Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I've clicked "like" @Sly Saint by way of thanks for the heads up. The content gets a :thumbsdown:.

    Windgassen again. :rolleyes:

    At one point I was told I might have Interstitial Cystitis. I spoke to the doc because of frequently wanting a wee. Diabetes came to mind.... I had none of the burning/stinging associated with cystitis.

    Many years later, talking to you good folk, I realise that episodes like this coincide with PEM.

    Anyway, now that Windgassen has addressed bowel issues it's obviously time to move on to wee. Normally, two completely different medical specialities, I wonder what this fascination with output can tell us.
     
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  3. James Morris-Lent

    James Morris-Lent Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I actually had a period of distressing bladder sensations at about age 12. When I finally went in to see a doctor she asked how much caffeine I was drinking. I cut out sodas and large Coke Slurpees and problem solved.

    Not to say that's what's causing the problem for other people. I just want to confirm that is truly distressing when your bladder feels like it's violently twitching all the time, with painful/other sensations, as well.

    :sick::sick::sick:

    Driveling article, and all that, not to mention.
     
  4. Arnie Pye

    Arnie Pye Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Just the title tells me this paper won't be worth reading. Rather than discussing the psychology of sufferers and studying ways to make patients accept their suffering and be good little patients who don't upset doctors by making them aware of their limitations, why don't they actually believe patients and try and cure them? It's been done - this article describes an approach that has worked for quite a large number of women :

    https://www.theguardian.com/society...ief-for-women-with-chronic-life-changing-utis
     
    It's M.E. Linda, EzzieD, inox and 7 others like this.
  5. Barry

    Barry Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Is this what's known as p*ssing into the Wind..
     
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  6. rvallee

    rvallee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    So at the same time as Eysenck's work is being discredited people are continuing to push the exact same belief system with zero afterthought. No need to look further about why people believed in this stuff back then: many still believe in it today. I guess the mantra is that it's completely different, somehow. Though I think it far more likely that people who promote this ideology find nothing wrong with his research and see the debate over it as a witch hunt.

    Really telling the framing of acceptance and exercise as "good answers". Bias is so normal in this research it doesn't even bother being subtle. You are guilty of thought crime, please report to re-education so we can correct your flawed thinking.
     
  7. strategist

    strategist Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    As one would expect to occur merely due to differences in the severity of the health problem(s) faced by the patients.

    A person with mild problems is going to perceive them as such, have less problems accepting the illness, and will be less ill (ie. able to do more of the activities that healthy people do like exercising).
     
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  8. MEMarge

    MEMarge Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Love this phrase
     
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  9. Sarah94

    Sarah94 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Windgassen is a brilliant name but I'd expect someone with that name to be writing about bowel issues.

    Yes, I am childish.
     
  10. chrisb

    chrisb Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  11. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  12. unicorn7

    unicorn7 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    There have been a few studies in this area. There was a study where they checked the urine of chronic UTI patients with a DNA-based test, instead of the old standard test. I think it was 98% that had a chronic infection... Most had a more complicated infection than a standard E.coli. I think it was 2 years ago that I read this, I don't get why it needs to take so much time to change treatments. It's not that difficult!

    I remember when I had never had a UTI, I thought people were overreacting about them, it can't be thát painful, I thought. When I got one, I found out that it's really really horrible. I really can imagine that (male) doctors that have never had a UTI, are underestimating the pain and suffering. I seriously can't imagine having a chronic UTI, it would drive any sane person absolutely insane.
     
  13. Arnie Pye

    Arnie Pye Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I went through a phase of having UTIs when I was a student a few decades ago. The worst one had me peeing blood and the pain was excruciating. But I was lucky - none of the bladder infections became chronic. What I have got now though is a chronic pain in my left kidney which I've had for nearly 20 years. And if I had to guess I would assume it is considered to be me attention-seeking and an MUS if/when I ever mention it to a doctor nowadays. So I just don't mention it.
     
  14. dave30th

    dave30th Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    In college there was a doctor at the health services named Dr Rectanus. At least he was a GP, not a proctologist.
     
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