1. Guest, the 'News in Brief' for the week beginning 19th September 2022 is here.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Welcome! To read the Core Purpose and Values of our forum, click here.
    Dismiss Notice

Central Sensitization Syndrome and Hypothyroidism: An Evaluation of Symptom Severity and Comorbid Diagnoses, 2019, Howard et al

Discussion in 'Psychosomatic research - ME/CFS and Long Covid' started by Dolphin, Jan 22, 2020.

  1. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    3,501
    Gives percentages of those with CFS broken down by severity

    https://www.spotlightonresearch.com/health-science-research/kh2019
    Free full text:
    https://www.spotlightonresearch.com/s/Howard-K-et-al-2019-xtxp.pdf

     
    Sly Saint, Milo, spinoza577 and 3 others like this.
  2. strategist

    strategist Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    4,504
    Is there any reason to think this is not pure circular thinking?

    Someone made a long and varied list of symptoms they believe are caused by a disorder they believe exists, called central sensitization syndrome.

    Someone else then goes through a list of patients with hypothyroidism and finds that the patients who by some measures are more severely ill also happen to have more of the symptoms (or more severely) that are said to occur in central sensitization (in particular the most unspecific one like fatigue, depressive symptoms, headache, aches/pains) which also happen to be symptoms of hypothyroidism (not sure about the headache).
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2020
  3. Invisible Woman

    Invisible Woman Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    10,284
    Hmmm....

    My conclusion is that hypothyroidism is a lot more complicated than many doctors think and that contrary to the belief of many UK docs not every patient does well on levothyroxine. Some need liothyronine which is difficult to get.

    The "normal" ranges for thyroid function test results are absurdly wide. However, if a patient's results are within the normal range that's good enough for many docs. Even if the patient is still experiencing symptoms.

    There are a range if nutrients, zinc for example, which are important for conversion between thyroid hormones (it's complex). In my experience GPs don't discuss those.

    So, I believe it would serve patients better if these chaps would actually recognise and do something about the known inadequacies in the treatment of hypothyroidism before they start chucking labels on people.

    I am hypothyroid and so was one of my dogs. My dog got better treatment from my vet than I did from my GP. :rolleyes: :mad:
     
  4. Andy

    Andy Committee Member

    Messages:
    17,457
    Location:
    Hampshire, UK
    Just from the abstract that looks like they use CFS when they mean CF.
     
  5. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    3,501
    CFS is listed explicitly in Table 4. Comorbid Diagnoses

    Though who knows what definition they use
     
  6. Milo

    Milo Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    1,859
    It seems like they are trying to say that some hypothyroid patients are overcomplaining and may have this imaignary illness that they call Central Sensitization Syndrome.

    It is unfortunate that patients with multiple co-morbidities are not carefully assessed medically and instead are being shoved into harmful diagnosis that stigmatizes them further. It also means that patients need to be extra careful with what they tell doctors so this burden of stigmatizing diagnosis does not follow them everywhere they go.

    Can’t they try to explain why is it that patients with hypothyroid experience more pain? Have they assessed other hormones to see if it is a multi-hormonal problem? Can’t they look at post mortem tissues of patients living with multiple and poorly explained co-morbidities, including the thyroid tissues?
    How about examining neuroinflammation via magnetic resonance spectroscopy such as what Dr Jarred Younger has done?

    The questionnaire can only tell researchers what they want to hear. How many of us answered questionnaires and have the feeling that they had much more to say then the questions they answered?
     
    rvallee, Snowdrop, Mithriel and 3 others like this.
  7. spinoza577

    spinoza577 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    454
    Probabaly they make themselves some notes from different articles and then put them together in a formal logical way. If there are words there will be found a meaning, too (Lichtenberg, I believe).
    Common sense and self suggesting things are most difficult to see, here.


    A kaleidoscope brings more sense about.

    But they go for, amen.

    To my knowledge "central senzitation" is an interpretation of certain symptoms (probably quite a range of them). It makes no sense "to examine" the relationship between a thing which is found in the world and a further guess, as if one would examine the relationship between a dog and a sausage.

    They might have examined the relationship between hypothyroidism and certain symptoms (which are still awaiting their proper interpretation). I am not sure if this association is really new, it´s probably only a more detailed investigation made here. In consequence they are about to sell an interpretation for a fact (once more).
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2020

Share This Page