1. Guest, the 'News in Brief' for the week beginning 14th June 2021 is here.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Welcome! To read the Core Purpose and Values of our forum, click here.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Contribute to feedback on the CDC Evidence Review, for more details click here
    Dismiss Notice

A Machine Learning Approach to the Differentiation of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data of CFS. Baraniuk et al. 2020

Discussion in 'BioMedical ME/CFS Research' started by John Mac, Jan 30, 2020.

  1. John Mac

    John Mac Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    457
    Likes Received:
    5,412
    Full Title:
    A Machine Learning Approach to the Differentiation of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) From a Sedentary Control.


    https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fncom.2020.00002/full


     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 30, 2020
  2. adambeyoncelowe

    adambeyoncelowe Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    2,304
    Likes Received:
    16,711
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 30, 2020
    Andy and ScottTriGuy like this.
  3. mariovitali

    mariovitali Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    2,419
    Very interesting study. They used a validation method which i also don't come across often (shuffling). I am not an expert on this but i found some excerpts suggesting (?) that certain activated areas are associated with panic / anxiety disorder :

     
  4. strategist

    strategist Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    3,678
    Likes Received:
    37,592
    I think this is the part that stood out most

     
    adambeyoncelowe, mariovitali and Andy like this.
  5. Andy

    Andy Committee Member (& Outreach when energy allows)

    Messages:
    13,299
    Likes Received:
    96,150
    Location:
    Hampshire, UK
    And of course we don't know if differences in that area of the brain are a cause or an effect.
     
    Mij, Snow Leopard, Michelle and 8 others like this.
  6. Adrian

    Adrian Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    5,308
    Likes Received:
    27,968
    Location:
    UK
    Given their very small data set this doesn't surprise me but if they had more data other classification techniques may start to show better results.
     
  7. Adrian

    Adrian Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    5,308
    Likes Received:
    27,968
    Location:
    UK
    The positive prediction rate which is the proportion of positive classifications (which I assume to be CFS) which are correct is interesting in that it goes up on the second day - even though overall accuracy falls. The negative prediction rate falls. This seems to suggest that on the second day those who were predicted as in the CFS group were more likely to be but the levels of prediction in the CFS group generally went down.

    I wonder if this has a relationship to the use of Fukuda where PEM is optional?
     
  8. Hutan

    Hutan Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,091
    Likes Received:
    58,937
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Haven't read much of the study. But this all seemed a bit random - 29 areas identified as different between teh CFS cohort and the controls on Day 1 and 28 areas identified as different on Day 2 - but only 10 areas different on both days.

    I'll wait to see the study done again with a new and larger set of patients meeting a criteria requiring PEM before thinking much about this one.
     
    Michelle, Andy, John Mac and 2 others like this.
  9. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    2,883
    Likes Received:
    20,071
    Location:
    Australia
    Hmm...

    "Speech suppression without aphasia after bilateral perisylvian softenings (bilateral rolandic operculum damage)"
    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF02043975

    "Interictal discharges have neuropsychological effects in rolandic epilepsy"
    https://www.medwirenews.com/epileps...neuropsychological-effects-in-rolandi/7105850
    "Indeed, they found that scores for verbal IQ on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children correlated significantly with the dynamic functional connectivity of the left SMG and right rolandic operculum in the phases before and after centrotemporal spikes."

    https://www.mdedge.com/psychiatry/a...white-matter-deficit-seen-stuttering-children
    "Interestingly, the left rolandic operculum abnormality was not related to ongoing stuttering, because no difference was found in this region between children who recovered and children who continued to stutter. This may indicate that the abnormality indicates a risk for stuttering, not whether there is a chance of recovery, the investigators noted."


    Differences within the rolandic operculum before the exercise challenge may simply reflect selection biases with regards to the verbal intelligence of patients versus controls.

    Now the differences within patients before and after the challenge may be interesting, but it is important not to confuse cause with effect, as Andy mentioned.
     
    Michelle, Hutan, Simon M and 3 others like this.

Share This Page