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A hierarchical logistic regression predicting rapid respiratory rates from post-exertional malaise. Jason et al. 2020

Discussion in 'BioMedical ME/CFS Research' started by John Mac, Nov 18, 2020.

  1. John Mac

    John Mac Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/21641846.2020.1845287
     
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  2. Simon M

    Simon M Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    That potentially makes it the largest ever sample of mecfs peeps who have had a CPET. I would love to see The results for such a large sample. So far we’ve had a lot of small studies: what we need are large studies, or good meta analyses of small ones.
     
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  3. It's M.E. Linda

    It's M.E. Linda Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    This is from 12 May 2020, but I think I have seen it mentioned again in recent weeks (delayed due to Covid).

    https://meassociation.org.uk/2020/0...-changes-in-daily-activity-in-me-12-may-2020/

    In the ‘interview’ - Dr Clague-Baker of @PhysiosforME says that she hopes this feasibility study will proceed to a much larger study and that they can apply for funding from the NIHR.
     
  4. Trish

    Trish Moderator Staff Member

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    Discussed here:
    https://www.s4me.info/threads/uk-pl...ly-activity-2020-21-clague-baker-et-al.15110/
     
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  5. John Mac

    John Mac Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    That looks like a different study.

    The authors of this study are:

    Notes on contributors
    Joseph Cotler is a project director of ME/CFS research at the Center for Community Research at DePaul university. He has been conducting research on ME/CFS since 2018.

    Dr Ben Z. Katz is a Professor of Pediatrics at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and an Attending Physician in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Ann & Robert H Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. He has been studying chronic fatigue syndrome with the group from DePaul since 2002.

    Corine Reurts-Post is a doctor’s research assistant at the CVS/ME Medisch Centrum in Amsterdam, specializing in the treatment of patients with chronic fatigue.

    Ruud Vermeulen heads the Research department and the research and treatment of chronic fatigue and exercise physiology at the CVS/ME Medisch Centrum.

    Leonard A. Jason has been the principle investigator of ME/CFS research at DePaul university and the Center for Community Research for 25 years.
     
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  6. Trish

    Trish Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree it's a different study. I was pointing out the the study @It's M.E. Linda linked in post #3 is discussed on a different thread.
     
  7. dreampop

    dreampop Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    This study looks pretty interesting as it addresses the psychiatric/biological cause with a large group of adult patients (as Simon noted). I don't know when I'll be able to read it, but I got a little confused by the prepositional phrase regarded PEM which can be easily misread as PEM is a symptom of me/cfs *and* psychiatric/somatic symptoms.

    Although, I must admit I can't remember ever hyperventilating. It seems possible I might cross the thresshold of 20 breaths in minute when it's driven by tachycardia, a more common symptom of mine.
     
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  8. Hutan

    Hutan Moderator Staff Member

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    I haven't read the study yet, but assuming the finding is correct, there's faster breathing in PEM

    Factors that affect breathing rate: age, gender, size and weight, exercise, anxiety, pain, the effect of some medicines, smoking habits and excitement level, infections, sepsis

    The pain of PEM could possibly be the cause of the finding of faster breathing. But might be more that the body is under stress somehow - it thinks it is exercising when we are just lying down, or it thinks it is fighting an infection.

    Same. I'm pretty sure an elevated resting heart rate is correlated with PEM.

    Both exercise and infections can increase both breathing rate and heart rate.
     
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