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Using structural and functional MRI as a neuroimaging technique to investigate CFS/ME. Almutairi et al. 2020

Discussion in 'ME/CFS research' started by John Mac, Aug 31, 2020.

  1. John Mac

    John Mac Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Full title: Using structural and functional MRI as a neuroimaging technique to investigate chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalopathy: a systematic review.

    Authors: Basim Almutairi, Christelle Langley, Esther Crawley, Ngoc Jade Thai

    https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/10/8/e031672
     
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  2. TiredSam

    TiredSam Moderator Staff Member

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    Next up is a systematic review of using structural and functional MRI as a neuroimaging technique to investigate pervasive refusal syndrome.
     
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  3. lunarainbows

    lunarainbows Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Wait why is Esther Crawley interested in doing imaging of brains of PwME? That’s not what she usually does?
     
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  4. TiredSam

    TiredSam Moderator Staff Member

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    Perhaps she's adding another string to her bow, or another pie to her fingers.
     
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  5. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Does failure to find a unique neuroimaging profile of ME imply that this is secondary to the real problems? (Ignoring possible issues with cohort selection.)

    There is evidence that there are problems with neuronal metabolism, and that is looking very likely to be the major issue here. If there is pervasive nerve and support cell metabolic derangement, then it could be expected that the abnormalities are more distributed and harder to profile.
     
  6. Trish

    Trish Moderator Staff Member

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    Perhaps the imaging department at Bristol want her to provide patients for an imaging study, so she gets to put her name on the preliminary systematic review that says more research is needed, to justify asking for funding.
     
  7. lunarainbows

    lunarainbows Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    This is interesting - what do you mean?
     
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  8. NelliePledge

    NelliePledge Moderator Staff Member

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    Or a sign she’s waking up and smelling the coffee and has decided to change horses midstream

    :whistle:
     
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  9. rvallee

    rvallee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Gotta pretend to do some "bio" is my guess. Which it isn't really, doing a review of bio stuff is not doing bio stuff but then again, BPS is all pretend so it's fitting.
     
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  10. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    There are a number of lines of evidence, including the recent paper showing low CO2 in the brain and possibly ubiquitous orthostatic intolerance. Here is the review by Cort, but I have not read the original paper so its hard to comment. Further we have two studies showing something in the blood that is dampening energy production, one of which is about mitochondria, including the nanoneedle findings at Stanford. Neurons are very vulnerable to low energy states, they require a lot of energy to function properly. Then there was the Komaroff study some years ago, showing that the timing of neural connections was in disarray, and that there was additional neuronal recruitment. Its a highly cited study but I would have to go looking to find the reference. Finally we have the invasive CPET finding of high 02 in the returning venous blood ... this implies its not being used. Under normal conditions neurons are very oxygen hungry.

    On a personal note I had an HMPAO scan of my brain metabolism in the 90s, and it was low. This was when I was still cognitively functional enough to be starting my PhD, before my first big crash. Please note that this scan was for tagged glucose, and if our brains are preferentially burning other fuels due to derangement then this might not be that atypical for us.

    Nothing is conclusive right now, but the evidence of abnormal brain metabolism is growing. I think a few of our researchers are now doing studies that might show more, but we have to wait for publications in due course.
     
  11. Mithriel

    Mithriel Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Note she does not consider that they problems with the studies could be the wide ranging definition used so the patients are not homogeneous.

    I worry that she is taking a leaf out of the FND book. They have used dodgy research to show that FND is not a disease of exclusion but can be positively diagnosed using specific signs and tests so bringing it into the medical domain. This is a frightening development as it makes it harder to fight the diagnosis and show it for the rubbish it is.
     
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  12. Ravn

    Ravn Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    There seems to be a fashion for systematic imaging reviews. Here's a similar one (link below). Both conclude current studies are too few, too small and too varied to draw any firm conclusions.

    Only one of the reviews feels the need to repeatedly point towards the one study that claims to have found that CBT changes the brain. No prize for guessing which review that was.

    To be fair, the review wasn't quite as bad as I feared it would be after I saw the name EC. Maybe the other authors were trying to do a decent job of it but were reliant on EC to get the funding/get it published so they had to make some concessions to her like the CBT changes the brain thing?

    The other review is this one:

    Neuroimaging characteristics of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS): a systematic review; Shan et al

    https://translational-medicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12967-020-02506-6

    https://www.s4me.info/threads/neuro...fs-a-systematic-review-shan-et-al-2020.16633/

    edit: grammar
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2020
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  13. adambeyoncelowe

    adambeyoncelowe Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Sometimes names are just on the paper because they helped out. E.g., with recruiting patients.
     
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