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United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust is looking to employ a Spiritual Healer / Reiki Therapist Aug 2020

Discussion in 'Health News and Research unrelated to ME/CFS' started by Sly Saint, Aug 7, 2020.

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  1. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    https://edzardernst.com/2020/08/uni...to-employ-a-spiritual-healer-reiki-therapist/
     
  2. rvallee

    rvallee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Well, yeah. Embrace one pseudoscience and you embrace them all, once you give in to the concept of BS medicine anything goes. I'm surprised it took this long, actually. Good times ahead for state-sponsored quackery. How homeopathic of them, fighting "delusion" with delusion.

    My guess is that this is part of some attempt to take the most recalcitrant non-compliant patients and try to see if using traditional pseudoscience works just as well as the standard psychosocial stuff like CBT, which it absolutely would. This here has the exact same effectiveness as anything in the psychosocial toolkit. Literally. That may turn out to be a monkey paw thing, though, proving their stuff is junk, but nothing that can't be waived off by logical fallacies and some good old reversing of causation.

    What's next on the bingo card? Astrologer? Homeopath? Exorcist? Psychics? Complete free-for-all. YEEEEHA!
     
  3. Wonko

    Wonko Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    So if I was to apply, and get the position, would I get bonuses for not turning up and therefore diluting my 'treatments' to make them much more effective, in line with homeopathic thinking?
     
  4. Trish

    Trish Moderator Staff Member

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    Provided it is paid for by the charity and not by the NHS, and patients are completely free to opt in or out, I would class this in the same category as the Hospital Chaplain service. If people want religious comfort that suits their beliefs, I have no problem with it. If they make claims beyond helping patients who believe in it to cope, or if the practitioners make false promises, there's a problem.
     
  5. Invisible Woman

    Invisible Woman Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Ah now, at least they let you lie down to have reiki. You don't have to speak, if they play annoying "soothing" music you can put in some earplugs. I'd say it's probably less likely to do you any harm than directive CBT.

    There's even a Reiki distance healing that could compete with internet CBT.

    Between a choice between this and Trudge Chalder's offerings, I'd go for the Reiki. If only for the nice lie down.
     
  6. Hutan

    Hutan Moderator Staff Member

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    Posts about the suggestion that mask-wearing might cause kidney problems have been moved here:
    Coronavirus - myths
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2020
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  7. Peter Trewhitt

    Peter Trewhitt Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    When I first started working in clinical settings, part of my geographical area was very strongly Roman Catholic with regular groups going to Lourdes. I got very practised at introducing the concept of ‘spiritual healing’, the idea that a cure might not be reflected in the hemiplegia or the dysphasia disappearing, but in the pilgrim’s relationship with God, their ‘state of grace‘.

    What surprised me was I never came across anyone who felt disappointed that they did not have a physical cure, and did know a number of people who felt they had had a spiritual cure; usually one that would need topping up again in six months or a year. So I suspect I was not the only person involved with these patients talking about spiritual cures. One of the priests I worked with had I suspect a very similar approach to me, though others I think believed if people had enough faith biomedical miracles were possible, not that different to the Lightning Process or the BPS approach to ME.

    So like @Trish, if the NHS is not paying and no one is saying things that are untrue, I have no objection to people already interested exploring healing. Though I do worry that healing being provided in a formal health setting by some one providing the healing outside its original spiritual context is inherently at risk of being false advertising.

    [added - Just for clarity I am not saying I believe in the reality of ‘spiritual healing’, but that for some people operating in that belief system it can provide an albeit transient sense of well being.]
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2020
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  8. Wits_End

    Wits_End Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Although the chaplains, of whatever sort, don't claim to be healing anything, so is it actually the same category?
     
  9. Trish

    Trish Moderator Staff Member

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    I have no idea. For me it seems like the same category, since both involve belief rather than scientific evidence.

    But then the same could be said for all non physical therapies. I wonder how much difference there is between a chaplain, an alternative medicine healer and a psychotherapist. All have their belief systems and their practitioners aiming to influence the thoughts and feelings, and consequently the behaviour and hence the mental and / or physical health of their clients.

    Provided they don't mess with the heads of their clients with false promises or judgement and blame, and fit with the beliefs of the client, they can give comfort and help with coping. But there is plenty of scope for harm too.
     
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  10. Invisible Woman

    Invisible Woman Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    As @Trish says, depending on how the thing is presented it could be beneficial. I have net a fair few cancer patients who really enjoyed Reiki sessions and felt they benefitted.

    One of the things with something like Reiki or meditation is that, for that period of time, you have permission to do nothing else. You can just completely relax. That can be a new and therapeutic experience for some people.

    Where it annoys me - when Reiki instructors or masters (instructors who teach other instructors) start spouting guff such as you attract your own luck or fate from the universe or the universe is teaching you something you needed to learn.

    I heard a Reiki master say this to a group of people which included a young teen with a severe neurological condition. This poor kid had been badly bullied because of it just to make it worse and treatment wasn't doing anything to help. I was hopping mad.

    While well intended the flip side if this "positivity" is very toxic, it ultimately means you deserved this bad thing to happen to you. Of course, you can work through it by continuing the Reiki and seeking spiritual development and growth. Lovely little sales pitch, though I believe the person I heard spout it genuinely believed that guff.

    The problem with her sincerity was it shone through and made the message all the stronger to the vulnerable. Yet, if she was so spiritually and philosophically aware would she really be so blind as inflict that kind of harm in a vulnerable person, let alone a traumatized kid?
     
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  11. Sarah94

    Sarah94 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    My aunt is a so-called reiki healer and it's very annoying, although thankfully she has finally stopped sending me invitations to her reiki facebook group.
     
  12. Dx Revision Watch

    Dx Revision Watch Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    This service is available to patients with cancer in our Poole NHS Trust area, via the Dorset Cancer Centre

    https://www.poole.nhs.uk/a-z-services/c/cancer-care/complementary-therapies.aspx

    Complementary therapies

    The complementary therapies offered at the Dorset Cancer Centre act to balance the highly technological and specialist environment of modern healthcare. They aim to encourage the potential of self-healing and empowerment.


    Most therapies are offered on an outpatient basis, although the therapists also visit the wards of the Dorset Cancer Centre and Forest Holme.

    Patients receiving treatment at the Dorset Cancer Centre are able to access the service free of charge. All patients will be assessed by the therapist before treatment, who will advise on the appropriateness of each therapy. In some circumstances certain therapies are not safe and the therapist will provide guidance to individuals on this.

    The cancer centre has a small team of three qualified and registered therapists who provide the following therapies free of charge:

    Aromatherapy
    Aromatherapy uses the essential oils of plants. The oils are absorbed through the skin during massage, helping to promote relaxation and a feeling of well-being. Our therapist offers patients a half-hour treatment comprising hand and foot massage.

    Indian head massage
    Indian head massage is a treatment based on Ayurvedic techniques involving work on the upper back, shoulders, neck, scalp and face. A variety of massage movements are used to relieve accumulated tension, stimulate circulation and restore joint movement. The treatments help to reduce stress and fatigue, improve sleep and relaxation, and release neck and shoulder tension.

    Emotional Freedom Technique
    Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) is a psychological therapy that may help with the anxiety and stress associated with cancer and its treatment. In particular, it can help with panic attacks, fear of needles and anticipatory nausea.

    Reflexology
    Reflexology uses pressure applied by the therapists’ hands on reflex points on the feet. The aim of this treatment is to improve the energy flow throughout the body, to release stress and toxins and increase energy levels. Reflexology is available to patients six weeks after completing chemotherapy or radiotherapy.

    4x4 support classes
    These are four classes held over four weeks looking at various complementary therapies that support patients after cancer treatment including nutrition, counselling, relaxation and self help techniques. They are organised in accordance with demand.

    Yoga
    Gentle yoga sessions are offered weekly and are especially designed for cancer patients. Prior experience is not essential and patients are supported throughout in a small group.

    Other therapies
    All the consultants in the Dorset Cancer Centre support the use of the complementary therapies provided in the centre. Patients wishing to use other therapies privately are advised to discuss this with their consultant to ensure that there are no safety concerns.
     
  13. Sarah94

    Sarah94 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Please tell me that this isn't funded by the NHS?!
     
  14. Dx Revision Watch

    Dx Revision Watch Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I'm not sure how this is funded, Sarah94, but it may being funded as an outreach service by this local hospice which is a registered charity:

    Forest Home Hospice

    https://forestholmehospice.org.uk/complementary-therapies/


    (...)

    Dorset Cancer Centre has a small team of two part-time qualified and registered therapists and three volunteers.

    ------------------------

    The Poole NHS page says:

    "Most therapies are offered on an outpatient basis, although the therapists also visit the wards of the Dorset Cancer Centre and Forest Holme."
     
  15. Amw66

    Amw66 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Cancer generally has many " supportive " options.
    One of my cousins used acupuncture and massage during her treatment for cancer.
    I don't know how this was funded though.
     
  16. Mithriel

    Mithriel Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I go to aromatherapy massage and find it very beneficial. (I know how much by how bad things have been since lockdown stopped me going!)

    VOCs from plants do seem to have some effect on our mood, think about a walk in a forest, and we evolved alongside flowering plants but they do not do have the powerful properties some aromatherapists think.

    Massage, in the other hand, should be part of the NHS. There is nothing alternative about it. Muscles go into spasm and stretching and warming them helps relieve it.

    I had damaged my neck muscles from using the wheelchair and was getting very bad headaches. It took about 10 sessions before she could move my neck from side to side.

    Frozen shoulders are treated in mainstream medicine by manipulating under general anaesthetic and cerebral palsy contractures can be prevented by massage too.

    I liked reflexology though it did not improve my energy flows or release stress and toxins :) It was definitely alternative medicine and just felt nice.
     
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