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Transactivation of human endogenous retroviruses by tumor viruses and their functions in virus-associated malignancies, 2019, Chen et al

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Hutan, Mar 16, 2021.

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  1. Hutan

    Hutan Moderator Staff Member

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    https://www.nature.com/articles
    Open access

    Jungang Chen, Maryam Foroozesh & Zhiqiang Qin

    Abstract
    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), viral-associated sequences, are normal components of the human genome and account for 8–9% of our genome. These original provirus sequences can be transactivated to produce functional products. Several reactivated HERVs have been implicated in cancers and autoimmune diseases. An emerging body of literature supports a potential role of reactivated HERVs in viral diseases, in particular viral-associated neoplasms.

    Demystifying studies on the mechanism(s) of HERV reactivation could provide a new framework for the development of treatment and prevention strategies targeting virus-associated tumors. Although available data suggest that co-infection by other viruses, such as Kaposi’s Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), may be a crucial driving force to transactivate HERV boom, the mechanisms of action of viral infection-induced HERV transactivation and the contributions of HERVs to viral oncogenesis warrant further studies.

    Here, we review viral co-infection contributes to HERVs transactivation with focus on human viral infection associated oncogenesis and diseases, including the abilities of viral regulators involved in HERV reactivation, and physiological effects of viral infection response on HERV reactivation.
     
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  2. Hutan

    Hutan Moderator Staff Member

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    So, it looks like infection with a virus e.g. EBV can create an environment that activates human endogenous retroviruses to produce proteins.

    I thought this was good when read alongside Activation of endogenous retroviruses during brain development causes an inflammatory response, 2021, Jönsson et al which was posted today. That paper suggests that activation of HERVs in neurons can result in microglial activation.

    I think there have been some papers looking at HERV proteins in people with ME/CFS. I don't think we've seen anything remarkable yet, but I find it an interesting idea.
     
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  3. Hutan

    Hutan Moderator Staff Member

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