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The theory of effort minimization in physical activity (TEMPA), Cheval, B/ Boisgontier, M (2021)

Discussion in 'Other health news and research' started by MSEsperanza, Feb 23, 2021.

  1. MSEsperanza

    MSEsperanza Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Cheval, Boris & Boisgontier, Matthieu. (2021). The theory of effort minimization in physical activity (TEMPA). Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews.
    https://www.researchgate.net/public...ffort_minimization_in_physical_activity_TEMPA

    Abstract
    Seems to be connected to this project:

    BMEC: Behaviors Minimizing Energetic Cost
    https://www.researchgate.net/project/BMEC-Behaviors-Minimizing-Energetic-Cost
     
  2. Trish

    Trish Moderator Staff Member

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    I wonder how much resistance to physical activity in countries like the UK is because of the way it is focused in schools on competitive sports. Even individual activities like dance and swimming and exercise classes have a competitive element built in, with dance exams and swimming certificates, and exercise class teachers inevitably being so much fitter than their class, and the feeling of inadequacy this engenders.
     
  3. strategist

    strategist Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    When I moved out of a dirty city into a beautiful town with many trees and gardens, my physical activity increased without having to force myself.

    Instead of the usual psychological view of the individual being the problem and somehow, 80% of the population being lazy, the low levels of physical activity should be seen as a systemic problem, probably the result of many different factors that act on the individual.

    The raising inequality, and competitive achievement orientied culture is I suspect a big factor. If after work you have little energy and time left, you're not going to go for a long walk in nature.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2021
  4. Sarah94

    Sarah94 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    God yes. And I always hated exercise at school because my co-ordination is SO BAD, so I was terrible at ball sports, and everything really. And so many PE teachers that I had were nasty really. One used to keep throwing balls at me at random moments FFS.

    After compulsory PE was over, I discovered that there were ways to exercise without making a fool of myself, and was then quite happy to exercise, and didnt feel inadequate doing it, in fact I actually enjoyed it. (And then a few years later I got ME, but that's another story.)
     
  5. Sarah94

    Sarah94 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    This is also so true.
     
  6. Kitty

    Kitty Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I agree, there's nothing mysterious about it at all. My dad walked half an hour to work every day for decades, but if it had been on a bus route or he'd had a car, he wouldn't have done.

    The developed world is engineered to encourage us to pay for the convenience of not having to do activity, and it'll only get more so. Close to where I live, some people are no longer even walking to the bus stop – they hire electric scooters instead. You see them parked in rows next to busy stops.
     
  7. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Yes, this is so true - it seems to be time pressures/environmental factors, rather than a sudden onset of a strange neuropsychological disorder causing exercise aversion across the entire population!
     
  8. strategist

    strategist Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Let's hope Chalder doesn't read the forum or she will very soon find this disorder is real, as proven by responses to questionnaires after CBT, and obviously best treated with CBT. And the best part is almost the entire population needs treatment. A real goldmine.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2021
  9. Wonko

    Wonko Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Exercise 'aversion' isn't some new strange thing.

    It's a result of evolution selecting it as a valid method of survival - don't waste energy, be as efficient as possible with what energy you have, as getting more can be dangerous, and tricky - or was before farming, just eat, and supermarkets were invented.

    Look at most animals, do they go down the gym? Do they go on pointless walks/runs (other than territorial maintenance/enforcement and hunting/grazing)? Do they lift heavy things for no obvious reason?

    No, what they do, mainly, when not hunting, eating, etc. is socialise or sleep.

    Why would humans be any different?

    It's not aberrant behaviour, it's the way we are supposed to be - all that's changed is external factors, like desks, supermarkets, cars, and of course, TV. All 'invented' in an attempt to use less energy to meet our needs/desires, to increase 'efficiency'. Efficiency, the desire to use less energy, is built into us, at a cellular level.

    The things that weren't like this died, probably from starvation, due to using more energy than they could replace, coz they were 'inefficient', or at least not efficient enough.

    Everything is about energy, teeth are about applying a local force that overwhelms the local resources of the thing they are biting, the bigger those resources the bigger teeth are needed to so so. Hunting is about energy, having more, or being more efficient, than what you are hunting.

    So being efficient, and energy sparing, apart from on the few occasions you need to use it, is not only advisable, it's essential - without doing so you die (at least from a species point of view).
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2021
  10. Arnie Pye

    Arnie Pye Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I completely agree with you about the competitive element being built in, and I never liked that. But what really killed off exercise for me as a teenager at school was the way I had to dress. In summer I wore a white shirt and baggy navy-blue pants, plus yellow woolly socks. I can't remember the footwear, but I can guarantee it would have been very basic. In winter I wore exactly the same, only with a navy jumper on top. The outfit was the same even when it was snowing and there was snow lying on the ground. I played hockey in winter with a ball painted half red and half blue so it could be seen while we were playing. Legs that were an unpleasant mixture of blue (from the cold) and red (also from the cold) was standard.

    The teachers wore track suits, probably with thermal underwear underneath, thick jumpers and huge, fur-trimmed parkas over the top, plus scarves, gloves and woolly hats. Other pupils with more money than my family did had extra clothes, but I only remember one (rich) girl who wore a tracksuit. The rest of us made do with whatever was available, but being half naked seemed to be part of the humiliation. The only way I would have got more clothes to wear while doing sports was if the school had made them compulsory.

    Since I was short and podgy I just associate sports with humiliation. I've never enjoyed exercise since.

    Edit : Note for American readers - When I referred to wearing baggy navy-blue pants I was referring to underwear, not trousers.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2021
  11. NelliePledge

    NelliePledge Moderator Staff Member

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    Exercise for the sake of it is such a privileged perspective isn’t it. What about people who work in physically demanding jobs filling Amazon orders or washing and dressing elderly frail people. What about people who rely on public transport. They don’t have any scope to ‘resist’ physical activity.
     
  12. duncan

    duncan Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Seems to me there is an argument to be made for a correlate, a cognitive one. TEMMA: The Theory of Effort Minimization in Mental Activity. If there were, I would subscribe to it. I do my best to minimize concentration, strong emotions, math, judgement...I do not mean this ironically. I pay a high price when I over do it cognitively.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2021

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