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The mapping of cortical activation by near-infrared spectroscopy might be a biomarker related to the severity of [FM] symptoms, 2021, Donadel et al

Discussion in ''Conditions related to ME/CFS' news and research' started by Andy, Aug 5, 2021.

  1. Andy

    Andy Committee Member

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    Full title: The mapping of cortical activation by near-infrared spectroscopy might be a biomarker related to the severity of fibromyalgia symptoms

    Abstract

    The delta value of oxyhemoglobin (Δ-HbO) determined by functional near-infrared spectroscopy at prefrontal cortex (PFC) and motor cortex (MC) based on primary (25 °C) and secondary (5 °C) thermal stimuli presented a larger peak latency at left MC in fibromyalgia than in controls. The difference between HbO concentration 15 s after the thermal stimuli ending and HbO concentration before the thermal stimuli onset (Δ-HbO*) at left PFC increased 47.82% in fibromyalgia and 76.66% in controls. This value had satisfactory discriminatory properties to differentiate cortical activation in fibromyalgia versus controls. A receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis showed the Δ-HbO* cutoffs of − 0.175 at left PFC and − 0.205 at right PFC offer sensitivity and specificity of at least 80% in screening fibromyalgia from controls. In fibromyalgia, a ROC analysis showed that these cutoffs could discriminate those with higher disability due to pain and more severe central sensitization symptoms (CSS). The ROC with the best discriminatory profile was the CSS score with the Δ-HbO* at left PFC (area under the curve = 0.82, 95% confidence interval = 0.61–100). These results indicate that cortical activation based on Δ-HbO* at left PFC might be a sensitive marker to identify fibromyalgia subjects with more severe clinical symptoms.

    Open access, https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-021-94456-2
     
    shak8, TigerLilea, Hutan and 3 others like this.
  2. Hutan

    Hutan Moderator Staff Member

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    Hmm, they've definitely drunk the Kool-aid. 'Chronic primary pain condition', 'significant emotional distress', 'depressive symptoms', 'prototypical condition of central sensitivity syndrome', 'persistent state of high reactivity that amplifies nociceptive stimuli', 'psychological distress' - all in the first paragraph. They seem to jump from a plausible 'people with fibromyalgia having hyper-sensitive pain neurons' to a much less plausible 'people with fibromyalgia are over-reacting to everything'. Maybe they are right, but I don't think we have seen good evidence of a lack of emotional resilience in people with fibromyalgia.

    So, they used functional near-infrared spectroscopy:
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2021
    shak8 and Trish like this.
  3. Hutan

    Hutan Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Australia
    The study is to measure blood flow to various parts of the brain while sequentially reclining, reclining with right hand in warm water, reclining, reclining with right hand in very cold water, reclining. (sorry, added that a bit later)
    22 women in the fibromyalgia group and 19 in the control group. The controls didn't look much like the fibromyalgia group, being considerably younger, for example, and with quite different medication profiles.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2021
    Michelle, shak8, Trish and 1 other person like this.

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