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Strategies for coping with cognitive difficulties

Discussion in 'Neurological/Cognitive: Brain Fog, Concentration' started by InfiniteRubix, Mar 23, 2019.

  1. Arnie Pye

    Arnie Pye Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I found one of the questions on that quiz totally meaningless for me. This one :

    I have trouble following conversations because I am distracted or because I am trying to remember what I wanted to say.

    The choice of answers was 1) Often or 2) Not often.

    The truthful answer for me would have been :

    I have trouble following conversations because I'm deaf as a post. :rolleyes: :grumpy:
     
  2. Arnie Pye

    Arnie Pye Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I have had some improvement with my cognitive difficulties from changing my diet quite radically. I used to eat a high carb diet, and had ended up with pre-diabetes. Last year I changed to eating a much lower carb diet with far more fat. I only eat the kinds of fats and oils that would have been recognizable to people somewhere in the world about 200 years ago. I am more alert and slightly more energetic on this diet. I also think I sleep better than before.

    I have had frequent relapses back into eating a high carb diet, and as a result I haven't lost any weight, but rather than give up completely as I have done in the past, I have been persistent and kept on restarting the low carb, high fat diet. I am managing to keep to it longer before relapse than I did at the start. I would like to lose some weight, but it isn't really my top priority. I just want to feel better, and I don't want my pre-diabetes to progress to overt diabetes type 2. I have succeeded in reverting my HbA1c back to non-diabetic levels, although it is still too high for my liking.

    I also supplement a lot. I don't absorb iron well so I take a maintenance dose of iron to keep it within spitting distance of optimal. I take vitamin B12 (methylcobalamin) because I feel better with high levels. I also take a B Complex capsule and vitamin D most of the time. I don't go outside much so I need to supplement. I also take magnesium and potassium occasionally. I've probably forgotten one or two things I take.

    I've been taking lots of supplements for years. I have to admit that changing my diet has had more beneficial effects on how well I feel than all those thousands of supplements I must have taken over the years.
     
  3. InfiniteRubix

    InfiniteRubix Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I think this thread has been very interesting.

    I kind of get the feeling that this is less of disorder per se, and more of a symptom of other things like ASD, ADD, ADHD. And those three are very possibly related anyway, with almost totally overlapping circles i.e. maybe the same thing.

    And then there's the likely elevated probability of comorbidity of ASD with ME, which can't help cognition/executive functions.

    But executive dysfunction seems a nice way to conceive of a specific symptom in any case e.g. versus pure memory issues, for example

    Exactly - this thread has been very useful for this

    Nice contributions
     
    Subtropical Island likes this.

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