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Researchers develop synthetic T cells that mimic form, function of human version

Discussion in 'Health News and Research unrelated to ME/CFS' started by Indigophoton, Jun 26, 2018.

  1. Indigophoton

    Indigophoton Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    UK
    https://m.phys.org/news/2018-06-synthetic-cells-mimic-function-human.html
     
    Aroa, Andy, andypants and 4 others like this.
  2. Wonko

    Wonko Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    5,207
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    Near perfect - what could go wrong?
     
    TiredSam, Trails, alktipping and 6 others like this.
  3. Melanie

    Melanie Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    :nailbiting:
     
    alktipping, Indigophoton and Wonko like this.
  4. Hutan

    Hutan Moderator Staff Member

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    16,027
    Location:
    New Zealand
    :rofl: It's probably prejudiced and ignorant of me, but synthetic t-cell manufacture is not what I would have expected from someone focused on dentures and the like.
     
  5. Alvin

    Alvin Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    3,309
    Would this make ME/CFS better or worse?

    Worst case kills the patient, best case they become zombies
     
    Melanie and alktipping like this.
  6. Forbin

    Forbin Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    1,408
    It sounds like these would be non-living, t-cell-sized, flexible capsules with a surface coating that makes them stick to infected cells. I guess the interior of the capsule would contain some sort of cytotoxic substance that would somehow get released when contact is made. Sounds like they've achieved the first step of making flexible, t-cell-sized capsules.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2018

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