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Patient–physician gender concordance and increased mortality among female heart attack patients, 2018, Brad N. Greenwood et al.

Discussion in 'Health News and Research unrelated to ME/CFS' started by Hutan, Aug 8, 2018.

  1. Hutan

    Hutan Moderator Staff Member

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    ...
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2018
  2. Trish

    Trish Moderator Staff Member

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    This paper was mentioned on another thread here.


     
  3. Inara

    Inara Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    If you train enough, you will get accustomed to females. You can even learn to respect them and treat them as equals!

    That's a shame.

    I always knew there is a reason why I feel a bit less comfortable with male doctors...
     
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  4. Tia

    Tia Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    This study was mentioned on Woman's Hour today in a discussion about gender inequality in health care. The discussion seems to have been prompted by a report from the BMA that has just been released entitled 'Addressing unmet needs in women's health'. The discussion focuses heavily on domestic abuse but also mentions some other factors.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bd6y8p it starts at about 18 minutes.

    If anyone wants to tweet or email in could be interesting, they did ask for interaction.

    The report: https://www.bma.org.uk/collective-v...ch/public-and-population-health/womens-health
     
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  5. TrixieStix

    TrixieStix Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Merged thread

    "Overall, the team found that female physicians outperformed their male colleagues, and their patients were, on the whole, more likely to live. That’s consistent with other studies: For example, it’s what Ashish Jha from the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health found in 2016, in a study of almost 1.6 million U.S. patients. “If male physicians had the same outcomes as female physicians, we’d have 32,000 fewer deaths in the Medicare population,” Jha wrote. “That’s about how many people die in motor vehicle accidents every year.” It was a striking finding..."

    https://www.theatlantic.com/science...-attacks-if-treated-by-female-doctors/566837/
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 9, 2018
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  6. Hutan

    Hutan Moderator Staff Member

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    So it sounds as if there are a few things going on. As well as some male doctors not treating female patients so well (due to dismissing the patient as over-exaggerating symptoms or not bothering to become familiar with different ways female patients might present), it might be that some female patients aren't as comfortable explaining what they are feeling to a male doctor. And then it seems that female doctors might be, on average, better at treating both men and women. [Edit: as well as the possibility that the finding is a statistical artefact due to the number of female doctors being relatively small.]

    Even the latter cause two causes might arguably be a result of sexism.

    Given that the Greenwood et al study tracked outcomes of patients in one hospital from 1991 to 2010, the female doctors perhaps were, on average, better than their male counterparts simply because, more often than not, those women who got to the stage of being in charge of treating heart attacks had to be more determined, more dedicated and smarter on average than their male colleagues.

    This Japanese university went as far as changing the tests scores in medical exams (males' up, females' down),
    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/...doctors-grades-changed-medicine-a8475966.html in order to reduce the intake of female students. But there are plenty of more subtle forces acting to filter less focused or less competent female doctors out of the profession while allowing similar male doctors to continue to practice.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2018
  7. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    I wonder whether the women are, on average, younger than the men, and their training therefore more up-to-date? That would be likely, because the numbers of females doctors graduating is much higher now than, say, 30 years ago - so most doctors over 50 will be men.
     
  8. Little Bluestem

    Little Bluestem Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    This would be because they know the female doctors will listen to them.
     
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