1. The 'News In Brief' post for w/c 8th October is now available Guest, click here.
    Dismiss Notice

OMF: Meet the team at the ME/CFS Collaborative Research Center at Harvard, funded by OMF

Discussion in 'BioMedical ME/CFS News' started by Eagles, Oct 10, 2018 at 6:03 PM.

  1. Eagles

    Eagles Established Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    1,301
    OMF: Meet the team at the ME/CFS Collaborative Research Center at Harvard, funded by OMF

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) Collaborative Research Center at Harvard, funded by OMF

    https://www.omf.ngo/2018/10/10/harvard-center-research-team/

    We are proud to announce the establishment of another ME/CFS Collaborative Research Center. This research initiative, which includes participants from Harvard Medical School (HMS) affiliated hospitals is supported by the Open Medicine Foundation (OMF). The participating HMS Institutions include the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), & Beth Israel-Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC). The new initiative begins with a dozen faculty from the three Harvard Institutions together with critical collaborators from the University of Birmingham, England and University of Nottingham, England, who comprise the MRC-Arthritis Research UK Centre for Musculoskeletal Aging Research, as well as long term highly valued collaborators in the fields of proteomics and metabolism from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)...
     
  2. Sasha

    Sasha Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    2,002
    Likes Received:
    15,535
    Location:
    UK
    Three Brits!

    Broken up for ease of reading:

    Janet Lord, PhD, Professor of Immunology, University of Birmingham, and Chair of Immunology. Dr. Lord directs the Institute of Inflammation and Ageing and the MRC-Arthritis Research UK Centre for Musculoskeletal Ageing Research.

    Dr. Lord brings together fundamental scientists and clinicians to translate the understanding of inflammation to new treatments for chronic age-related inflammatory diseases.

    Her research focuses on the dysregulation of immunity in old age, and in particular, the decline in neutrophil function and how this compromises the response to infection and tissue injury.

    Her knowledge and leadership in the natural findings of inflammation upon tissues will be critical to understand many of the findings that are discovered in ME/CFS patients in this new initiative.

    She brings two essential colleagues to the new OMF Center, Drs. Paul Greenhaff and Philip Atherton.

    Paul Greenhaff, PhD, Professor of Muscle Metabolism, University of Nottingham, is a physiologist and the Deputy Director of the MRC-Arthritis Research UK Centre for Musculoskeletal Ageing Research (Nottingham).

    Dr. Greenhaff is also an active member of the ARUK Centre for Sport, Exercise and Osteoarthritis and the Musculoskeletal Disease theme of the Nottingham NIHR Biomedical Research Centre.

    He is classically trained in the field of muscle metabolism with research interests centered on the loss of muscle mass and the dysregulation of metabolism in ageing, inactivity, inflammation, trauma and disease, and strategies to offset these pathophysiological events.

    His expertise will be critical to understand what the nutritional and sedentary effects are contributing to patients with ME/CFS in the new initiative.

    Philip Atherton, PhD, Professor of Clinical, Metabolic & Molecular Physiology, University of Nottingham is classically trained in stable isotope nutritional biochemistry, providing tremendous experience in the inflammation and metabolism fields.

    His laboratory is in the Royal Derby Hospital under the auspices of our UK Medical Research Council/Arthritis Research UK Centre of Excellence for musculoskeletal ageing research and the newly awarded NIHR Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) under a clinical musculoskeletal theme.

    His research seeks identification of central mechanisms regulating metabolism in human musculoskeletal tissues. These interests and expertise will be critical to the new OMF Center.​
     
    MEMarge, Indigophoton, EzzieD and 5 others like this.
  3. Cinders66

    Cinders66 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    423
    Likes Received:
    2,669
    Looks good. Is it coincidence these are also MRC researchers or has this collaboration been engineered. It will be great if America or anyone has inspireD three new Brits to get involved. OMF is funding some great stuff now and showing that money plus will plus good scientists equals progress afaic.
     
    MEMarge, Dolphin and andypants like this.
  4. Ravn

    Ravn Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    207
    Likes Received:
    1,666
    Always nice to see the establishment of another ME research center, especially one featuring new (new to me anyway) names. The more the merrier!

    @mariovitali will find this one interesting: Jon Jacobs (my bolding) ;)
    Edit: corrected tag
     
  5. Andy

    Andy Committee Member

    Messages:
    3,729
    Likes Received:
    28,046
    Location:
    Hampshire, UK
    The one concern that I have with these people is that we have evidence of Arthritis Research UK researchers conflating ME with fibromyalgia in at least one study, hopefully these three will have better understanding than that.
     
    MEMarge, andypants, Cinders66 and 2 others like this.
  6. Alvin

    Alvin Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    2,239
    Likes Received:
    11,158
    Dr Davis knows how to pick good researchers.
     
    MEMarge, andypants and Trish like this.
  7. Andy

    Andy Committee Member

    Messages:
    3,729
    Likes Received:
    28,046
    Location:
    Hampshire, UK
    And I'll reserve my judgement until they prove that they are good researchers.
     
    MEMarge, NelliePledge and andypants like this.
  8. Alvin

    Alvin Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    2,239
    Likes Received:
    11,158
    Of course
     
    MEMarge likes this.

Share This Page