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Obituary of Michael Gelder Times 28/04

Discussion in 'PsychoSocial ME/CFS News' started by JohnTheJack, Apr 28, 2018.

  1. JohnTheJack

    JohnTheJack Moderator Staff Member

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  2. chrisb

    chrisb Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    He was acknowledged in the paper by Sharpe setting out the Oxford Criteria as one of those assisting with funding of the meeting. His interest in the subject remains unclear.
     
  3. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I'd previously drawn attention to this section in a book from Jonh Bancroft, a researcher who'd promoted aversion therapy for 'deviant' sexuality. There are aspects of the mentality which remind me of certain biopsychosocial CFS researchers, and it mentions working with Gelder and Marks (Marks was a co-author with Wessely and Chlader of the first CBT for CFS RCT):

    http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=bI-Jau14aLAC&pg=PA256&lpg=PA256&dq=isaac marks homosexuality&source=bl&ots=EahcH42DBn&sig=FcaDNR4JeBD5OC3piJNA353ZQMU&hl=en&sa=X&ei=mKeAUPqeOY3htQao0IDgCw&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=isaac marks&f=false
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2018
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  4. JohnTheJack

    JohnTheJack Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks, both, that's very interesting. Helps explain perhaps why Peter Tatchell has been so willing to support us.
     
  5. chrisb

    chrisb Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I wonder whether the missing link between Sharpe's CBT for CFS and Gelder is Hawton

    They co-authored:
    Follow up of patients presenting with fatigue to an infectious diseases clinic.

    Sharpe M, Hawton K, Seagroatt V, PasvolG
    1992 Br Med J 305 147-152

    Hawton had earlier written:
    Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for psychiatric problems: apractical guide. Oxford Medical Publications, Oxford 1989 Editors, Hawtpn, Salkovskis,Kirk, Clark DM.

    Clark had co authored with Gelder.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2018
  6. chrisb

    chrisb Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Would you say that in 2018 it could reasonably be stated that CBT was a "highly effective treatment for CFS? Did not even its most ardent advocates make more limited claims for its efficacy by that date? That however is the claim mad in the tribute from Oxford.

    New and highly effective forms of cognitive-behaviour therapy were developed for Panic Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Hypochondriasis, Post-traumatic stress disorder, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Bulimia Nervosa. These cognitive-behavioural treatments have been widely adopted in clinical practice, are recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, and provide better long-term outcomes than alternative approaches such as antidepressant medication.

    https://www.psych.ox.ac.uk/news/professor-michael-gelder-1929-2018

    It seems entirely plausible that his work in other fields was beneficial. But this is very revealing of the mindset. It is successful for other treatments. Why would it not be successful for CFS? "Gilding the lilly" in this way seems rather demeaning. That of course is the fault of the survivors of the school. Not of the deceased.




     
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