No antibiotics worked, so this woman turned to a natural enemy of bacteria to save her husband's life, 2022, LaMotte

Discussion in 'Other health news and research' started by Alvin, May 17, 2018.

  1. Alvin

    Alvin Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    This is a very long article, i've only gotten through about 20% of it so far

    https://www.motherjones.com/environ...resistance-phage-therapy-bacteriophage-virus/
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 9, 2022
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  2. andypants

    andypants Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Worth the long read!:)
     
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  3. Allele

    Allele Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Yes, very interesting! Thanks Alvin :thumbup:
     
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  4. Alvin

    Alvin Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Thanks, i'm mentally in bad shape right now, might be next week before i actually get through reading it, my backlog is ginormous and includes more important matters beyond reading articles and have high priority (doctor's appts, arranging transportation, making decisions, fixing a few broken things at home and so forth)
     
  5. ScottTriGuy

    ScottTriGuy Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Montreal conference casualty. You are not alone.
     
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  6. Alvin

    Alvin Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    More has happened since, i sometimes worry if i completely lose my ability to think i'm screwed :dead:
    When i get more acetyl carnitine tablets delivered i will be raising the dose again
     
  7. DokaGirl

    DokaGirl Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    This is an opinion piece written by Dr. Steffanie Strathdee," infectious-disease epidemiologist, and associate dean of global health sciences and professor at the University of California, San Diego, school of medicine. She also directs the new UC San Diego Center for Innovative Phage Application and Therapeutics and is an adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins and Simon Fraser Univeristies. She is the co-author of The Perfect Predator: A Scientist's Race to Save Her Husband from a Deadly Superbug."


    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opi...revive-a-forgotten-cure-to-combat-the-global/
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 9, 2022
  8. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    see also this thread:
    https://www.s4me.info/threads/virus...stem-into-ignoring-bacterial-infections.8810/
     
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  9. DokaGirl

    DokaGirl Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Thank you @Sly Saint.

    I did note the other thread. While these articles are both talking about phages, I thought the link you posted was talking about phages letting bacterial infections run rampant, and therefore harming people, which appears to contradict this article; rather confusing.

    I thought a separate post would be better. But, maybe I misunderstood the meaning of the first post.

    (That's never happened before - ha!:laugh:)

    If the moderators would like to move this post please do so.

    Thank you!
     
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  10. Trish

    Trish Moderator Staff Member

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    Trying to get my head around two different phage stories.

    I think we have two completely different situations with different phages.

    A phage, or bacteriophage is a virus that infects only bacteria. Viruses can only multiply by entering cells of other organisms, in this case bacterial cells and hijacking the cell's functions to replicate themselves.

    There are lots of different phages that infect different bacteria, so their relevance to bacterial illness will be different too.

    One lot are being used as medical treatment to kill off bacterial infections.

    Another lot are hypothesised to enable some bacterial infections to spread.

    Have I understood this correctly?
     
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  11. DokaGirl

    DokaGirl Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Thank you @Trish for your comments. I hope someone more sciency than me can decide whether these are two separate ways phages behave.

    My understanding is these two articles are about different ways phages work.

    But I don't know if I've understood correctly.

    I was going to add this article to @Andy's post, but thought that would be confusing, as it seems to contradict the first article. I kept meaning to post the Canadian newspaper article earlier, as it's from March 1st, but was only reminded with @Andy's post. Sorry for the muddle. Maybe they should be posted together anyways.

    Thanks again for your post.

    :)
     
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  12. Laurie P

    Laurie P Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Merged thread

    No antibiotics worked, so this woman turned to a natural enemy of bacteria to save her husband's life, 2022, LaMotte

    https://www.cnn.com/2022/07/08/health/phage-superbug-killer-life-itself-wellness/index.html


    Edited to add title and quote box after my thread was merged.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2022
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  13. Laurie P

    Laurie P Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    The Perfect Predator: A Scientist's Race to Save Her Husband from a Deadly Superbug: A Memoir

     
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  14. Leila

    Leila Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    My father died of a nosocomial superbug (3MRGN) he caught after heart surgery.

    I researched superbugs back then and looked into phage therapy, there was no chance here in Germany to get it (I contacted a somewhat fishy organization but it didn't seem safe. As well as a heart surgeon that had written about phage therapy).

    Aside from ME itself superbugs are the biggest medical nightmare for me at a hospital. And I can't understand why there isn't been done more to prevent infection as well as researching for treatments, e.g. phage therapy.

    When I used to live in the very west of Germany, I would always get tested for MRSA at the hospital before they would let me stay. I asked why and they told be they adopted that from the Netherlands. Asking why that isn't being done everywherey I was told hospitals usually just don't want to know if you have it because then they'd have to isolate you. They don't have room or staff for that.

    The idea that previously easy to treat bacterial infections in the future might be incurable is setting us back a century.
     
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  15. Midnattsol

    Midnattsol Moderator Staff Member

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    One of the things I ask nurses when I've been interning at different hospitals is if they actually are tested for MRSA (as students we have to sign that we haven't been in a location where we are likely to get it), most laugh and say the hospital don't want to know for the same reasons listed here :( And the paper we student sign? It asks if we've been admitted to a hospital in a foreign country and that's pretty much it. As if one can only contract these bugs in a hospital (at the time I had to sign this there was a woman in the newspaper that had gotten an infection at the pool by her hotel when travelling in Europe, I can't remember if she lost her foot or not but it had not been easy for her)
     
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  16. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    You mean anywhere with people? Its everywhere now. If I recall correctly a decade ago half of all medical staff were carriers. One third in the general population. Not sure where this data was collated, might vary in different parts of the world.

    Phage therapy is most of a century old. However I am not sure that phages were carefully preselected to target specific bacteria in most of the studies, I don't think they were. That is the advance. Old one phage fits all therapy did not work too well except in a small minority of cases from what I had read some time back.
     
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  17. Midnattsol

    Midnattsol Moderator Staff Member

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    In Norway we like to think we don't have as much of it ;) But with more travelling, including travels for surgeries to countries where antibiotic resistance is rampant in hospital settings, I think it is more common than we like to believe. We are still trying to contain it, for example if MRSA is discovered in pigs, all pigs on the farm will be put down and the farm sanitized.
     
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  18. Midnattsol

    Midnattsol Moderator Staff Member

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    Multiple threads on the same story have been merged together.
     
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  19. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Twenty odd years ago I asked if ME patients have been tested for gut phages at an ME medical conference. Nobody thought it was important. If gut bacteria are infected but survive then they might function differently. The mitochondria are also very much like bacteria, and so potentially susceptible, but its hard to see how a phage might enter a cell by itself. Possibly only by riding with an intracellular pathogen. To date I don't think this issue has been investigated.
     
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  20. Kitty

    Kitty Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I saw a BBC programme maybe 25 years ago, warning that almost 100 years of Georgia's research into bacteriophages was at risk due to power outages and unreliable storage equipment in the aftermath of the civil war. It prompted something of a rescue effort, and the research facility and at least some of the original materials were saved.

    Phage treatments still seem to be a niche idea in the west, but I think they used to be fairly common in the Soviet bloc. I remember being treated with phages in Moscow for a nasty foot infection in the early 80s—it was in the form of a liquid that I had to use to clean the skin and the put on the dressings. No idea of the wider potential of the approach, obviously, but given that antibiotics seem destined to be a busted flush due to decades of industrial misuse, we do need something to replace them.
     
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