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NHS to offer paid-for DNA tests if patients share data

Discussion in 'Other health news and research' started by John Mac, Jan 26, 2019.

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  1. John Mac

    John Mac Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-47013914
     
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  2. Invisible Woman

    Invisible Woman Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    The snag is that peoplenhave the test and are identified as being at increased risk of developing something or other. They may be obliged to declare that to future employers, insurers, banks when they apply for mortgages etc.
     
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  3. hellytheelephant

    hellytheelephant Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    ...I think I would rather not know if Alzheimers is heading towards me...
    Totally agree re the insurance point. You could make yourself uninsurable.
     
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  4. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    This sounds deeply creepy to me.
     
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  5. TiredSam

    TiredSam Moderator Staff Member

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    What could possibly go wrong?
     
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  6. hinterland

    hinterland Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Haha! So sceptical guys! ;) Ok, so there're some potential downsides to signing up to this... but, overall, I think it's a good initiative; this sort of big data project is something the NHS is well positioned for. I'm in favour of it, but proceed with caution.

    I got tested at 23andMe a couple of years ago and have one copy of the ApoE4 allele, which marginally (depending how you quantify it) increases my risk of late onset Alzheimer’s disease. About 20% of the population will have at least one copy of ApoE4, but genes alone don't predetermine your fate, it depends how they are expressed, how they interact with the environment; on epigenetics in other words.

    This website here, has some good strategies for reducing your risk of Alzheimer’s. All common sense stuff that you're probably already doing as someone managing a chronic illness, or that you're unable to do anyway, in the case of the exercise recommendation.

     
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  7. TiredSam

    TiredSam Moderator Staff Member

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    I might start doing that. Thanks.
     
  8. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    While people like Wessely are involved in their judgements about the ethics of mass data collection I'm left feeling wary.

    I also think that this sort of proposal will mean that those who do not want to give the government access to their DNA will find it harder to access genetic testing on the NHS than they would have if this compulsion policy were not in place.
     
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