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KCL: New study identifies those most at risk from 'long COVID' Oct 2020

Discussion in 'Epidemics (including Covid-19)' started by Sly Saint, Oct 21, 2020.

  1. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    https://www.kcl.ac.uk/news/study-identifies-those-most-risk-long-covid

    eta:
    "The findings are due to be published as a pre-print on Medrxiv and have not yet been peer-reviewed."
     
  2. chrisb

    chrisb Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Is there a limitation with this in that it deals with people who were recognisably symptomatic with Covid 19 and tested positive. What about people initially with minor symptoms or wholly insidious onset, which seems to have been reported? Potential problems need to be noted.
     
  3. Michiel Tack

    Michiel Tack Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Looks interesting.

    If age and gender are predictive of developing long COVID, perhaps that means that those patients tend to be young and female while those at risk of developing a severe form of acute COVID-19 tend to be older and male. Have to wait until the preprint is out, but that would be an interesting result.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2020
  4. strategist

    strategist Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Important to keep in mind that this could be biased in various ways.

    The way that covid was initially viewed could influence which age group was tested, which symptoms were considered to be sufficient to justify a test, what symptoms were tracked.

    The same biases would also affect the control group.
     
  5. Sarah94

    Sarah94 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I thought somebody else (Italy?) found that 87% still had symptoms several months after infection. I'm so confused by all these wildly different statistics.
     
  6. Sarah94

    Sarah94 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    The MEA shared an article earlier today saying that long covid was most common in people in their twenties or thirties or forties. But this says more common in old people?
     
  7. chrisb

    chrisb Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    If there are no established and agreed criteria for inclusion it would be expected that there would be inconsistency in the findings.
     
  8. Michiel Tack

    Michiel Tack Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Seems like it, the press release reads:
     
  9. rvallee

    rvallee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    This was in hospitalized patients.
     
  10. rvallee

    rvallee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    As was pointed out, this is likely an undercount because of the number of Long Covid patients who stopped logging on the app because it doesn't fit their symptomology:



    Also unclear whether they consider all symptoms or drop some they don't consider relevant.

    Honestly just give money to patient groups instead, they do a much better job at this. This whole effort is hindered by the fact that people don't know what questions to ask yet always restrict their studies to questions they can think of.
     
  11. Wits_End

    Wits_End Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Female, over 55 and overweight were, I think, the 3 most likely qualifying criteria as stated on the news this evening. Still doesn't explain the preponderance of women who suffer from ME, though.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2020
    Leila, Invisible Woman and Kitty like this.
  12. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  13. rvallee

    rvallee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    The language used suggests this will be badly misused in the same way medicine has anchored for months (and ongoing for the most part) on the picture of old man with shortness of breath and fever, excluding those who don't fit those criteria rather than those criteria being used simply as a guide. Which itself created the problem of so many who should have had a test taken were denied and now face discrimination because of something that was refused to them as if they themselves were responsible for that decision.

    It's like a weird game of not-learning-from-lessons.
     
    Sarah94, Kitty, Snowdrop and 3 others like this.
  14. Invisible Woman

    Invisible Woman Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Can we insist that anyone, anywhere who ever considers writing a health questionnaire first has to have this tattooed backwards on their forehead so they have to read it every morning in the mirror?
     
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  15. Trish

    Trish Moderator Staff Member

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    I think this research is potentially interesting. I haven't read the paper, but I am participating, along with over 4 million others, in filling in the daily app questions 'Have you had a Covid test' and 'Do you feel physically normal'.
    If you answer that you've had a test, or that you have symptoms, you get more boxes to tick.

    It has been running from early in the pandemic, so they have data for millions of people over months, and can see patterns of things like what symptoms are most common, and how long they last. I think that is a valuable source of research data.
     
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