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Effectiveness of Active Therapy-Based Training to Improve the Balance in Patients with Fibromyalgia: A Systematic Review, 2020, Del-Moral-Garcia et al

Discussion in ''Conditions related to ME/CFS' news and research' started by Andy, Dec 4, 2020.

  1. Andy

    Andy Committee Member

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    Open access, https://www.mdpi.com/2077-0383/9/11/3771/htm
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 4, 2020
    alktipping and shak8 like this.
  2. shak8

    shak8 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Worth pursuing: prevention of falls by initiating balance exercises (mostly leg muscle work, and propioception) in fibro patients.
     
    alktipping likes this.
  3. rvallee

    rvallee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    TL;DR: this BS thing is slightly better at giving the illusion of being "effective" as those other BS things.

    When you fail to even try to understand the problem, you end spewing a whole lot of BS. Like this galactic-level crap:
    Good grief how the hell can we expect any bit of progress when absolute loons like this are involved in medical research? Even worse that this kind of research goes through a complex vetting process and actually gets approved and funded. This is just pathetic. This is beyond incompetence it's blatant misconduct and misuse of academic funding.
     
    Arnie Pye, inox, Art Vandelay and 5 others like this.
  4. alktipping

    alktipping Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    improving balance is some thing that physios have done for decades mostly with the elderly and often after this patient group has had many falls . i personally benefitted from this advice in a pain clinic of all places . this advice is not to help or improve any course of illness just to decrease your chances of falling and the resultant cost to the nhs .
     
  5. rvallee

    rvallee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Yes that's a perfectly valid thing to help with, in some cases. But the idea that doing this will resolve other symptoms is not. We can help disabled people without exaggerating the outcomes, or keeping expectations to what is credible and possible. We all know what people read from stuff like this, that if you can "treat" some arbitrary thing the whole thing is dealt with and can be put out of mind as fully solved.

    And of course it takes no account of the cost of doing so, with people who struggle with daily living. Benefits must be considered in full, not counted... hum... "creatively".
     
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