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Detecting Borrelia Spirochetes: A Case Study With Validation Among Autopsy Specimens, 2021, Gadila et al

Discussion in 'Infections: Lyme, Candida, EBV ...' started by 5vforest, May 11, 2021.

  1. 5vforest

    5vforest Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Detecting Borrelia Spirochetes: A Case Study With Validation Among Autopsy Specimens

    Authors

    Shiva Kumar Goud Gadila, Gorazd Rosoklija, Andrew J. Dwork, Brian A. Fallon, Monica E. Embers

    Abstract

    The complex etiology of neurodegenerative disease has prompted studies on multiple mechanisms including genetic predisposition, brain biochemistry, immunological responses, and microbial insult. In particular, Lyme disease is often associated with neurocognitive impairment with variable manifestations between patients. We sought to develop methods to reliably detect Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochete bacteria responsible for Lyme disease, in autopsy specimens of patients with a history of neurocognitive disease. In this report, we describe the use of multiple molecular detection techniques for this pathogen and its application to a case study of a Lyme disease patient. The patient had a history of Lyme disease, was treated with antibiotics, and years later developed chronic symptoms including dementia. The patient's pathology and clinical case description was consistent with Lewy body dementia. B. burgdorferi was identified by PCR in several CNS tissues and by immunofluorescent staining in the spinal cord. These studies offer proof of the principle that persistent infection with the Lyme disease spirochete may have lingering consequences on the CNS.

    Full text

    https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fneur.2021.628045/full
     
  2. 5vforest

    5vforest Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    It's frustrating that we're still stuck on the step of "trying to prove microbial persistence" but I thought this study was pretty interesting. Solid team of authors, looks like they used some novel methods for staining the tissues and PCR.

    The patient in question had an EM rash, was treated immediately with 10 days of doxy, and then retreated with IV ceftriaxone for 8 weeks and PO amoxicillin for 6 months (!).

    I guess the question is still whether or not the detected microbes were disease-causing.

    Interestingly enough, 1/7 of the healthy controls (from an endemic region in Macedonia, anyone know what is up with that?) tested positive as well.
     
  3. Joan Crawford

    Joan Crawford Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Location:
    Warton, Carnforth, Lancs, UK
    Many thanks for sharing
     
    duncan and 5vforest like this.

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