Comprehensive Multi-omics Analysis Reveals Mitochondrial Stress as a Central Biological Hub for Spaceflight Impact, 2020, Silveira et al.

Discussion in 'Other health news and research' started by SNT Gatchaman, May 18, 2023.

  1. SNT Gatchaman

    SNT Gatchaman Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Comprehensive Multi-omics Analysis Reveals Mitochondrial Stress as a Central Biological Hub for Spaceflight Impact
    Willian A. da Silveira; Hossein Fazelinia; Sara Brin Rosenthal; Evagelia C. Laiakis; Man S. Kim; Cem Meydan; Yared Kidane; Komal S. Rathi; Scott M. Smith; Benjamin Stear; Yue Ying; Yuanchao Zhang; Jonathan Foox; Susana Zanello; Brian Crucian; Dong Wang; Adrienne Nugent; Helio A. Costa; Sara R. Zwart; Sonja Schrepfer; R.A. Leo Elworth; Nicolae Sapoval; Todd Treangen; Matthew MacKay; Nandan S. Gokhale; Stacy M. Horner; Larry N. Singh; Douglas C. Wallace; Jeffrey S. Willey; Jonathan C. Schisler; Robert Meller; J. Tyson McDonald; Kathleen M. Fisch; Gary Hardiman; Deanne Taylor; Christopher E. Mason; Sylvain V. Costes; Afshin Beheshti

    Spaceflight is known to impose changes on human physiology with unknown molecular etiologies. To reveal these causes, we used a multi-omics, systems biology analytical approach using biomedical profiles from fifty-nine astronauts and data from NASA’s GeneLab derived from hundreds of samples flown in space to determine transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, and epigenetic responses to spaceflight.

    Overall pathway analyses on the multi-omics datasets showed significant enrichment for mitochondrial processes, as well as innate immunity, chronic inflammation, cell cycle, circadian rhythm, and olfactory functions. Importantly, NASA’s Twin Study provided a platform to confirm several of our principal findings.

    Evidence of altered mitochondrial function and DNA damage was also found in the urine and blood metabolic data compiled from the astronaut cohort and NASA Twin Study data, indicating mitochondrial stress as a consistent phenotype of spaceflight.

    Link | PDF (Cell)
     
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  2. SNT Gatchaman

    SNT Gatchaman Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I don't think we have this one referenced already. Posting due to some cross-overs with findings reported in ME and not just for the inclusion of the phrase "two murine space missions".

    :emoji_hamster::astronaut::emoji_vulcan:
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2023
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  3. SNT Gatchaman

    SNT Gatchaman Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  4. SNT Gatchaman

    SNT Gatchaman Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    With mouse and human astronaut subjects, including Mark and Scott Kelly who are identical twins (Mark 1 year on the ISS). This led to an excellent cohort descriptor of flight vs healthy control — which in this case is termed "ground control" :thumbup:

     
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    SNT Gatchaman Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    SNT Gatchaman Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  7. SNT Gatchaman

    SNT Gatchaman Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I might suggest that having a deep understanding of the pathophysiology of ME/CFS might be beneficial for this century's space missions (and beyond).

     
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    SNT Gatchaman Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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