Cognitive dysfunction 1 year after COVID-19: evidence from eye tracking, Carbone et al, 2022

Discussion in 'Long Covid research' started by cassava7, Nov 9, 2022.

  1. cassava7

    cassava7 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Increasing evidence suggests persistent cognitive dysfunction after COVID-19. In this cross-sectional study, frontal lobe function was assessed 12 months after the acute phase of the disease, using tailored eye tracking assessments.

    Individuals who recovered from COVID-19 made significantly more errors in all eye tracking tasks compared to age/sex-matched healthy controls. Furthermore, patients who were treated as inpatients performed worse compared to outpatients and controls.

    Our results show impaired inhibitory cortical control in individuals who recovered from COVID-19. The association between disease severity and its sequelae may contribute to a better understanding of post-COVID-19 cognitive function.

    Open access: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/acn3.51675
     
  2. cassava7

    cassava7 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Of note:

    “We found no correlation with MoCA subscores and saccadic performance, possibly due to a ceiling effect. The MoCA is a rapid cognitive screening tool, and our patients had normal scores.”

    The MoCA is the Montreal Cognitive Assessment test.

    A limitation of the study is that inpatients, and older patients, had more pronounced eye tracking impairments than outpatients. I am not sure how well it would translate to ME-like long Covid.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2022

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