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Association of T and NK cell phenotype with the diagnosis of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), Rivas et al, 2018

Discussion in 'BioMedical ME/CFS Research' started by Indigophoton, Apr 25, 2018.

  1. Indigophoton

    Indigophoton Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    The paper has been provisionally accepted by Frontiers in Immunology, and the full text is due to be published soon.
    https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fimmu.2018.01028/abstract
     
    andypants, unicorn7, Andy and 19 others like this.
  2. Hutan

    Hutan Moderator Staff Member

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    The one time my Treg cells were counted, I had a higher than normal number of them. I thought this was typical for PWME. But this study finds that
    :thumbsdown: (that thumbs down emoji has always looked more like a 'huh? head scratch' to me - I use it here to mean that)

    I look forward to seeing a scatterplot of the actual results. I guess numbers of cells is one thing, and good on this group for replicating studies, but the activity of the cells seems to be another, and perhaps more important?, thing.

    Good on the researchers also for using 'ME/CFS' rather than 'CFS'; an opening sentence with a definition that mentions more than just fatigue; CCC selection criteria; and a reasonable number of participants. :thumbsup: (That one is a thumbs up)
     
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  3. Lisa108

    Lisa108 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Same here. Maybe we are in a different subgroup?
     
  4. voner

    voner Established Member

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    my cd4+ numbers are consistently high and my CD8+ numbers are consistently low.
     
  5. Hutan

    Hutan Moderator Staff Member

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    From Wikipedia:
    My lab results just had a figure for 'T suppressor total' which is, I believe, the old term for regulatory T cells (Tregs). So it's hard to know what my measurement is of and if we are comparing apples with apples here. The fact that some normal T cells express the same biomarkers (e.g. CD4, CD8) might be a confusing factor too.

    Someone who actually knows what they are talking about with T cells - feel free to step in here.
     
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  6. Indigophoton

    Indigophoton Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  7. Andy

    Andy Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Anybody want to offer an opinion on how useful/good a study this is?
     
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  8. adambeyoncelowe

    adambeyoncelowe Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I'm keen to hear people's thoughts, too. T-cells and NK cells crop up a lot.
     
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  9. Seven

    Seven Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Mine were both low Ts and NKs (number and activity) not sure knowing this has helped me at all, since I cannot raise them no matter what I do (prescription drugs and supplements).
     
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  10. Manganus

    Manganus Established Member

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    My brain is nothing to trust, etc., etc., but my impression after reading the paper is that it might be of some value. But it's yet one more of these studies that come up with results that are not immediately possible to translate into clinical practice.

    It's a good thing they used strict (2010) criteria instead of Fukuda.
    It's another good thing they set out to test other groups' reported findings.
    It's yet another good thing they had a fairly large group of patients and controls.

    But its 70% hit-rate diagnosing patients with a blood test is in no way immediately useful.

    This paper may well be considered yet another piece in the puzzle. But many more pieces remain to be laid down, before we see the picture.
     
    Inara, Aroa, Sunshine3 and 8 others like this.

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