Association of fish oil supplementation with risk of incident dementia: A prospective study of 215,083 older adults, 2022, Xiaohui Liu et al

Discussion in 'Other health news and research' started by Mij, Feb 20, 2022.

  1. Mij

    Mij Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Abstract

    Background & aims: Evidence linking the use of omega-3 PUFA supplements with incident dementia is scarce. We aim to assess the relationship between fish oil supplementation and incident dementia risk among older adults with different apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotypes in a large population-based cohort.

    Methods: We included 215,083 participants (average age: 64.1 ± 2.9 y) without dementia at baseline from UK Biobank study. Fish oil use was assessed by a touch screen questionnaire at baseline. Dietary intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. The APOE genotypes were determined by allele variations on rs429358 and rs7412 from genome-wide genotyping of blood samples. Dementia was diagnosed using the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9 and ICD-10). Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate the associations of fish oil supplement use with dementia risk.

    Results: During an average 7.92 years of follow-up, 2054 participants were diagnosed with dementia. After multivariable adjustment for major risk factors, the use of fish oil supplements was significantly associated with a lower risk of all-cause dementia (p for trend = 0.004). Compared with non-users, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of dementia was 0.87 (0.79-0.96) for fish oil users. A marginal interaction was found between fish oil supplementation and APOE gene variants on the risk of dementia (p for interaction = 0.057). However, fish oil supplementation was not associated with the risk of any subtype of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia (VD), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD).

    Conclusions: Intake of fish oil supplements was associated with lower risk of all-cause dementia among 60-73 y elders. Our findings provide new population-based evidence for linking fish oil supplement use with dementia prevention.

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35124466/
     
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  2. Samuel

    Samuel Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    thought it was going to be other direction of association from the title.

    has helped with blepharitis, mood. can't have salmon due to esophagus issues.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2022
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  3. shak8

    shak8 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Second author affiliation is with: Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Agro-Food Processing, Fuli Institute of Food Science, College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang

    which leads me to doubt--could there be some political tainting of the study as China has huge industrial fishing vessels (sometimes illegal). Or am I just a paranoid American?
     
  4. shak8

    shak8 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    All those poor anchovies, tons of them, plus other sentient beings. There will be a better way (research leading to a pharmaceutical) to deal with Alzheimers without decimating further the fish population.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2022
  5. Wonko

    Wonko Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Thing is...humans, in fact all life, don't like aquatic life existing.

    First we spent millions of years to get out if the oceans, into what was largely desert, when at the time we couldn't actual breathe out of water. More than a mild dislike of other aquatic life. Must have been some row.

    Then, a bit later, we invested huge amounts of time and resources trying to exterminate the largest forms of aquatic life.

    We had laws which made it illegal not to consume aquatic life at least twice a week.

    We then proceeded to deliberately over fish to try and exterminate increasingly smaller varieties of aquatic life, and when that wasn't wiping them out fast enough we deliberately dumped as much toxic water into the oceans as we could produce.

    When even that hadn't wiped out all aquatic life, we then upped our game and started intensive farming, other both livestock and crops, to increase the amount of dangerous chemicals, many specifically known to be deadly to aquatic life, and effluents from billions of pigs, chickens, and cattle, all of which over time ends up in the oceans.

    Humanity hates aquatic life and is on a crusade to destroy all of it, using any means possible.

    If that means killing an entire fish to get a few grammes of oil then so be it.

    Or so it seems to me.
     
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  6. Midnattsol

    Midnattsol Moderator Staff Member

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    I doubt they had a very good measurement of marine omega-3 intake. Different supplements have different amounts of omega-3's, different ratios between EPA and DHA (some but not all also include DPA), there are also a number of other compounds that can be found in these supplements in addition to the omega-3 fatty acids (mine has vitamin A, D, K2 and CoQ10). A food frequency questionnaire is a poor way to collect intake, with lots of bias. (And is intake what we should look at, rather than absorption? Two people could eat the same amount but due to various factors in the digestive tract and other parts of the body have different concentrations of lipids in the body)

    And as always, people who has a healthy diet or take supplements presumably for their health may have other beneficial behaviors or factors in their life that could potentially be protective against dementia.
     
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  7. MeSci

    MeSci Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    You don't need fish to get omega-3s. It costs a bit more, but I get my DHA and EPA supplement from Healthspan: Veg-Omega 3 1,000mg (healthspan.co.uk)

    "Fish obtain their DHA and EPA from consuming microalgae. Good news… we can get these fatty acids not only from eating fish but straight from the source too. Veg-Omega 3 contains a proprietary and ground-breaking ingredient derived from natural algae which is rich in vegetarian and vegan omega 3 fatty acids DHA and EPA."

    (It should read "...are rich..." - "algae" is a plural word!)
     
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  8. Mij

    Mij Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    My own experience is that I did need fish oil based EPA and DHA to increase omega 3, but I've never tried natural algae so don't know if that would have been beneficial for me. I took plant based fatty acids for years but my omega 3 remained depleted.

    My cognitive function years ago when my omega 3's were depleted was atrocious, quite different from my cognitive dysfunction that I experience now.
     
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  9. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I remember in Basant Puri’s book he explained how non-fish sources of Omega-3 wouldn’t work as well as they need to be converted to a more active form and there may be a problem in the conversion process. However, algae wasn’t mentioned so don’t know where they fit.
     
  10. Mij

    Mij Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    The conversion from ALA to EPA and DHA is often limited, perhaps because of lacking enzymes, so many people are able to benefit more from EPA and DHA when these fatty acids come directly from the diet- mainly from oily fish or fish oil supplements. Fish oils were recommended to me by a biochemist who reviewed all my test results.
     
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  11. Midnattsol

    Midnattsol Moderator Staff Member

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    It's not uncommon that "fish oil" is used interchangeably with "marine omega 3s", although the questionnaire can include other sources of marine omega 3s such as algae (or it will have an option for "vegan" which is problematic since there are still plant based omega 3 supplements that contain ALA, not EPA and DHA like algae), seals or whales.
     

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