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Article: Fit to drop? Managing chronic fatigue syndrome in the workplace May 2020

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS news' started by Sly Saint, May 1, 2020.

  1. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Location:
    UK
    Not a recommendation
    CPD: Fit to drop? Managing chronic fatigue syndrome in the workplace
    On 1 May 2020 in Continuing professional development, Disability, Mental health and stress, OH service delivery, Sickness absence management, Occupational Health

    Case study
    https://www.personneltoday.com/hr/c...ng-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-in-the-workplace/
     
    DokaGirl, spinoza577, MEMarge and 3 others like this.
  2. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    On one of the authors:

     
    Last edited: May 1, 2020
    DokaGirl, spinoza577 and MEMarge like this.
  3. rvallee

    rvallee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I've heard of "my dog ate my homework" but this is more of a "did you dog do your homework?" because it actually be preferable and less humiliating.

    Really looking forward to the day ignorant opinions on the topic aren't so common. I sure could do with fewer of those, we all could.
     
  4. Snowdrop

    Snowdrop Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    2,134
    Location:
    Canada
    "Sally" is a perfect patient. Lucky break for this story.
     
  5. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Location:
    Australia
    She was willing and highly compliant, yet she is still ill at the end.

    The conclusion is horrifying, namely all they are interested in Sally's return to work, without considering the impact that this would have on the rest of her life - the fact that she wanted to cut her hours suggests she is still ill and is suffering: "she was considering reducing her contracted hours to allow her to better manage her symptoms.".

    The conclusion is extremely misleading, it says "She was enjoying aqua aerobics" but in the text is says Sally had participated in "one session of aqua aerobics"
     
    Snowdrop, Wonko, rvallee and 7 others like this.
  6. strategist

    strategist Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Recovery is a mindset and I'm recovered, said the patient from the bed he was confined to.

    The lightning process practitioner was thrilled she had been able to make the patient recover.
     
    Michelle, ukxmrv, Wonko and 7 others like this.
  7. ladycatlover

    ladycatlover Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Location:
    Liverpool, UK
    Lot of coloured flag waving! Yellow, red, blue and pink! Actually waving some flags would prob be more conducive to recovery than the process this poor lady has been through.
     
    Amw66, Wonko, DokaGirl and 2 others like this.
  8. DokaGirl

    DokaGirl Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    It would be interesting to know what the cut off, or time limit is for when sadness and grief qualifies as depression and mental illness.

    Surely 3 months isn't too long to be sad after losing a dear loved one.

    It is concerning, if I can use that word without being labeled with an anxiety disorder, to view BPS behaviour that pins depression, and mental illness on someone reacting normally following common life events.

    That being said, it is the usual misunderstanding to put it mildly, re ME, and the need for CBT and GET.

    It would also be interesting to see how "Sally' was doing in a 6 month, and 12 month follow up. Was she still working? Did her health deteriorate?
     
    Michelle, ladycatlover, Sean and 7 others like this.

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