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Post-acute COVID-19 syndrome negatively impacts physical function, cognitive function, health-related quality of life and participation

Discussion in 'Long Covid research' started by Kalliope, Oct 25, 2021.

  1. Kalliope

    Kalliope Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Location:
    Norway
    American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
    Post-acute COVID-19 syndrome negatively impacts physical function, cognitive function, health-related quality of life and participation - by Tabacof, Putrino et al

    Abstract

    Objective
    This report describes persistent symptoms associated with post-acute COVID-19 syndrome (PACS), and the impact of these symptoms on physical function, cognitive function, health-related quality of life and participation.

    Design
    Cross-sectional observational study design. Patients attending Mount Sinai’s PACS Clinic completed surveys containing patient-reported outcomes.

    Results
    A total of 156 patients completed the survey, at a median (range) time of 351 (82 to 457) days post COVID-19 infection. All patients were pre-vaccination. The most common persistent symptoms reported were fatigue (n = 128, 82%), brain fog (n = 105, 67%) and headache (n = 94, 60%). The most common triggers of symptom exacerbation were physical exertion (n = 134, 86%), stress (n = 107, 69%) and dehydration (n = 77, 49%). Increased levels of fatigue (Fatigue Severity Scale) and dyspnea (Medical Research Council) were reported, alongside reductions in levels of regularly completed physical activity. Ninety-eight (63%) patients scored for at least mild cognitive impairment (Neuro-Qol), and the domain of the EQ-5D-5 L most impacted was Self-care, Anxiety/Depression and Usual Activities.

    Conclusion
    Persistent symptoms associated with PACS appear to impact physical and cognitive function, health-related quality of life and participation in society. More research is needed to further clarify the relationship between COVID-19 infection and PACS symptoms, the underlying mechanisms, and treatment options.
     
  2. Kalliope

    Kalliope Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    5,320
    Location:
    Norway
    Quote from paper:

    The pattern of PACS symptoms resembles other post-viral syndromes, including dysautonomia25, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome26 and myalgic encephalomyelitis 27. It is unsurprising that physical exertion was the most common cause of symptom exacerbation, as this is a feature shared by some of these conditions. The potential for the worsening of symptoms following physical exertion is the most important consideration when prescribing rehabilitation therapies for people with PACS.28
     
    Wonko, Solstice, alktipping and 5 others like this.
  3. bobbler

    bobbler Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    583

    Is anyone else concerned about whether all these are to get traction on the term 'PACS'?

    As far as I can see post-acute = 'chronic' (or is post-acute actually worse because it doesn't even confirm chronic), covid-19 = covid-19 (but everyone will forget and it was so varied anyway in symptoms), SYNDROME

    So what 'chronic covid syndrome'? at best.... post-acute - what do they mean by that and what is that opening the door to? is it even accurate given that many with long covid seem to have worse 'long' symptoms than they had in the early stages.
     
    alktipping, cfsandmore and Kalliope like this.

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