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Corticosterone and pyridostigmine/DEET exposure attenuate peripheral cytokine expression: supporting a dominant role for neuroinflammation in a mouse

Discussion in 'Health News and Research unrelated to ME/CFS' started by Milo, Oct 21, 2018.

  1. Milo

    Milo Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Corticosterone and pyridostigmine/DEET exposure attenuate peripheral cytokine expression: supporting a dominant role for neuroinflammation in a mouse model of Gulf War Illness (2018) Michalovicz et al.

    (Drs Klimas, Fletcher are part of the authors)
    (I could not fit the whole title with the year and the author, not enough room)
    (technically Gulf War illness is not un-related to ME- I had trouble choosing the right category)

    Highlights

    •Sarin surrogate, DFP, causes minimal increases in cytokines in liver and blood.

    •Unlike results for the brain, CORT does not prime peripheral cytokine responses.

    •PB/DEET generally suppresses cytokine levels in our model of Gulf War Illness.

    •Lack of CORT priming in periphery supports a neuroimmune basis of Gulf War Illness.

    Abstract

    Gulf War Illness (GWI) is a chronic multi-symptom disorder experienced by as many as a third of the veterans of the 1991 Gulf War; the constellation of “sickness behavior” symptoms observed in ill veterans is suggestive of a neuroimmune involvement.

    Various chemical exposures and conditions in theater have been implicated in the etiology of the illness. Previously, we found that GW-related organophosphates (OPs), such as the sarin surrogate, DFP, and chlorpyrifos, cause neuroinflammation.

    The combination of these exposures with exogenous corticosterone (CORT), mimicking high physiological stress, exacerbates the observed neuroinflammation.

    The potential relationship between the effects of OPs and CORT on the brain versus inflammation in the periphery has not been explored.

    Here, using our established GWI mouse model, we investigated the effects of CORT and DFP exposure, with or without a chronic application of pyridostigmine bromide (PB) and N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), on cytokines in the liver and serum.

    While CORT primed DFP-induced neuroinflammation, this effect was largely absent in the periphery.

    Moreover, the changes found in the peripheral tissues do not correlate with the previously reported neuroinflammation.

    These results not only support GWI as a neuroimmune disorder, but also highlight the separation between central and peripheral effects of these exposures

    Link to the paper: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuro.2018.10.006
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2018
    andypants, Skycloud, Lidia and 2 others like this.

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