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You and ME: An Update on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis for Psychologists by Rose Silvester

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS News' started by Indigophoton, Jun 30, 2018.

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  1. Indigophoton

    Indigophoton Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Superb article for psychologists originally published in the June 2018 edition of the Journal of the New Zealand College of Clinical Psychologists (NZCCP). In the course of her research, the author spoke to @Carolyn Wilshire.
     
  2. Trish

    Trish Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree it's a superb article. The link you give is to a Facebook page. Is there any way to access the article in the Journal, I wonder?
     
  3. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  4. Webdog

    Webdog Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I read it on Facebook. Sign in was not required.
     
  5. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I agree excellent article.

    key phrases for me (relevant to the NICE stuff)

    "He denied that he was tired or fatigued. Nothing. His batteries were just flat."

    "We eventually achieved this diagnosis, but too late to be aware of the cumulatively damaging effects of the episodes of unwellness that we now know were “crashes.”"

    "Post-exertional malaise is a hallmark symptom. It simply means that the window for tolerating any exertion, be it physical, cognitive, or emotional has narrowed. A marked worsening of symptoms occurs in the 12–72 hours following exertion. This worsening, sometimes called a crash, can persist for days, weeks, months, or years. Inter-episode recovery decreases with each crash.

    "For around 25% of people, the window narrows to a point whereby activities of independent living are not possible. They are confined to their houses. Many are bed bound."
     
  6. Little Bluestem

    Little Bluestem Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    It's a shame that it takes some psychologist's child getting this disorder for them to get a clue. Assuming they do get a clue and don't accuse the mother of enabling or whatever.
     
  7. Sean

    Sean Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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