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  1. Jan87

    Jan87 Established Member (Voting Rights)

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    I am a newbie but I wrote a post about my ME/CFS and someone said for me to try find my TSH levels and I found one from December 2017 it was 1.3 and December 2018 it was 1.2 so gone down although the doc as always said everything fine. Just wondering if anyone else has same?
     
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  2. DokaGirl

    DokaGirl Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    @Jan87

    Do you know the reference range for TSH? I'm not sure if there is an internationally accepted reference range for TSH; there may be. The reference range for this may be the same whatever country one is in, but then again, it might not be.

    I understand that generally, if one's TSH falls within this reference range, then doctors usually view this as fine.

    Alternative physicians may have a different view about this. They may believe that a result at the very top end of the reference range, meaning your pituitary is really insisting your thyroid gland get going, requires thyroid medication.

    It might be an idea to look up the reference range for TSH.

    I find it a bit frustrating when physicians just tell me a number result, and don't provide the info about the reference range for that particular test.

    Patients can often get copies of their test results. Some countries may have regulations, court decisions etc., that say patients have a right to their test results.

    Yonks ago, my request for copies of basic test results was refused. Following a court case in my country in about 1990, patients can have access to their results. Some jurisdictions now enable patients to sign up to directly receive digital copies of these results. Hope this helps.
     
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  3. TigerLilea

    TigerLilea Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Here in BC we can get our lab results online for any blood work done.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2019
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  4. SallyC

    SallyC Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Reference range is 0.4-4 so it's within normal limits and at the low end. Like @DokaGirl said, TSH is more of a worry if it's high because it's not being responded to. Hope this helps.
     
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  5. TigerLilea

    TigerLilea Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    My TSH was down to .81 and no one was worried about it. One doctor pointed out to me that TSH levels fluctuate.
     
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  6. Barry

    Barry Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  7. FMMM1

    FMMM1 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Thyroid stuff is really interesting. However, I haven't kept up with it. If you search on-line then you'll probably find stuff linking thyroid function to ME/CFS e.g. see below*.

    Ron Davis's son is pretty much low in everything.

    Ron Tompkins (OMF - Harvard) in a recent interview highlighted that sepsis results in metabolic and immunological changes. So possibly chronic sepsis might affect thyroid function. I.e. changes in thyroid function in ME/CFS may be a consequence of ME/CFS [chronic sepsis] not the cause.



    *“Low T3 Syndrome” in Patients With Chronic Fatigue ... - NCBI - NIH
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5869352/
    by B Ruiz-Núñez - ‎2018 - ‎Related articles
    20 Mar 2018 - Keywords: chronic fatigue syndrome, thyroid, “low T3 syndrome”, ... Disturbed hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, presented as mild ... interactions between both the HPA and hypothalamus–pituitary–thyroid (HPT) axes and ...... fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS): increased interleukin-1, tumor necrosis .
     
  8. Amw66

    Amw66 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    TSH is a bit of a blunt tool - from the Lapp paper posted earlier:-

    Thyroid function tests.
    TSH is least important due to HPA Axis suppression in ME/CFS.
    Free T4 and/or total T3

    there has been research re issues with glucocortinoids, and a higher prevalence of low T3 has been found in ME
    https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fendo.2018.00097/full
    https://www.meassociation.org.uk/20...levels-of-key-thyroid-hormones-20-march-2018/

    Given that a hibernation state has been postulated this does make sense.

    My aunt uses daily temperature readings as a gauge for thyroid function ( she had a partial thryroidectomy in her early 30s) - I set up a spreadsheet for her that automatically graphs the input. The initial graphs were all over the place, it's a lot less variable now.

    I have heard that TSH falls in winter ( cue for semi hibernation), so it may depend when you are tested.
     
  9. DokaGirl

    DokaGirl Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    @Amw66

    Thank you for the note on Free T4 and total T3.

    I don't feel TSH is the only thyroid test to be done, and agree Free T4 and T3 are a good idea to have tested as well.

    There are panels of thyroid tests that can be done.

    And, the basal body temperature provides, as I've been told, some indication of how your thyroid is functioning.

    Apparently the autoimmune disease Hashimoto's causes much of the hypothyroid disease:

    https://www.thyroid.org/hashimotos-thyroiditis/
     
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  10. Little Bluestem

    Little Bluestem Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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