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Studies and data on PEM

Discussion in 'Post-Exertional Malaise, Fatigue, and Crashes' started by mat, Dec 2, 2020.

  1. mat

    mat Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    PEM has become a mandatory symptom in many CFS guidelines, so I would expect that there is plenty of data of monitored patients during the malaise/fatigue interval because this is when the disease's mechanism of action is amplified and certain biomarkers should stick out and be clearer. Maybe I'm not using the correct search terms, but I can't find anything.

    Fortunately, @Forbin referenced this study in another post (10.1016/j.jpain.2009.06.003), which is a gene expression monitoring, but it's not primarily what I'm looking for. I'm looking for typical metabolic profiles, blood biomarkers, and neurotransmitters over the course of the malaise.

    Maybe you have found something like this. I would appreciate any comments.
     
  2. Trish

    Trish Moderator Staff Member

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  3. strategist

    strategist Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  4. Creekside

    Creekside Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I agree that reliable before/during/after testing should provide a better chance of finding what changes. If I was doing the testing, I'd want EEG, CSF samples, and any other brain scanning that was available. If only blood and urine are available (cheap & convenient to sample), there might be some neurological markers that could be found, but maybe not. There might be neurochemical markers that don't cross out of the BBB, or which are too short-lived to travel into the body, but which are unpleasantly potent in the brain.
     
  5. mat

    mat Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Methylated neurotransmitters and precursors could be monitored via blood+urine. BH-4/BH-2 and other pterins can only be monitored in CSF and would provide better insight into activation and buffer of neurotransmitter metabolism.

    @Trish @strategist This is exactly what I was hoping for. Thanks!
     
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