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Most UK scientists who publish extremely highly-cited papers do not secure funding from major public and charity funders. Stavropoulou et al. (2019)

Discussion in 'Health News and Research unrelated to ME/CFS' started by Michiel Tack, Mar 1, 2019.

  1. Michiel Tack

    Michiel Tack Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  2. Michiel Tack

    Michiel Tack Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    New paper by Ioannidis, which I thought was interesting.
     
  3. Andy

    Andy Committee Member & Outreach

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    The 'old boy network', https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_boy_network, in full effect, though I have to admit that I would have thought that all the 'old boys' would be citing each other left, right and centre as well. Perhaps they don't see the need.
     
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  4. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    They cite each other, but since they all have 600 publications, none of any great interest, none of the papers scores 1000 citations.

    It is interesting to see that only 1,370 papers scored 1000 citations in the period. I have a paper with 2000 citations in that period. And I never got funding from the big three. But I never had any illusions things were going to be otherwise.

    And of course the rate of citation is not necessarily a sign of a good paper.

    It does bring the point home though.
     
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