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Blog: Local Democracy and Health, "The NHS Long Term Plan and Social Prescribing"

Discussion in 'Health News and Research unrelated to ME/CFS' started by Andy, Feb 4, 2019.

  1. Andy

    Andy Committee Member & Outreach

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    https://localdemocracyandhealth.com/2019/01/30/the-nhs-long-term-plan-and-social-prescribing/
     
  2. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Social Prescribing seems to be taking off in a big way the RCof Psych just had a conference on it






    see other tweets at #SocialPrescribing
     
    Andy likes this.
  3. JemPD

    JemPD Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Sorry to be thick, but what is 'Social Prescribing'? I scanned the article in the OP but I'm very foggy, i couldn't grasp most of it & it didnt appear to explain what it actually is anywhere.
    uh, i'm too ill for this, will come back another time when my brain functioning better
     
  4. Wonko

    Wonko Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    As far as I can understand what social prescribing is is that someone with a few hours training can prescribe certain drugs, or treatments, without the involvement of someone who has been medically trained to do such things.

    We don't have enough doctors you see, they keep leaving for less hostile/stressful environments, like Syria, as soon as we train new ones up.

    So someone's got to deal with all the patients.

    Of course I am hopefully wrong but that's the impression I've got in the last few months.
     
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  5. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I thought it was prescribing salsa dancing or whist drives.
     
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  6. Arnie Pye

    Arnie Pye Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I think social prescribing involves things like prescribing swimming lessons, exercise classes, gym attendance and classes, learning how to meditate and/or mindfulness, dancing classes, and referring people to rambling groups, working on allotments or community gardening. I don't know whether the actual activities live up to the hype.
     
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  7. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I wonder if they can prescribe sharing lived experience with Diane? That sounds fun.
     
  8. ladycatlover

    ladycatlover Moderator Staff Member

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    If you can actually get an allotment (long waiting lists over most of UK from what I can gather) I'd definitely recommend as being good... Except I haven't been well enough to go to my half plot for over 2 years now (been low ever since PIP assessment and the following upsets and then Tribunal).

    OH does it all at present. We mostly grow onions, garlic, shallots and broad beans. Oh, and potatoes. Some flowers too and whichever herbs survive (I think most of them have bit the dust now).

    People are mostly friendly there, and from when I did go there to garden I loved watching the crops growing and digging a little (sitting down in a plastic garden chair). It's pretty full on though, and quite a commitment.

    A community allotment would probably be more useful for mental health, in that there would be more people around, and maybe some horticultural help and advice available sometimes.
     
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  9. Simbindi

    Simbindi Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Sly Saint, Arnie Pye, Amw66 and 2 others like this.
  10. Simbindi

    Simbindi Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  11. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    That seems to me a bit like the famous saying about quantum mechanics 'If you try to take it seriously you cannot take it seriously.'
     
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  12. Mithriel

    Mithriel Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I actually think it could be good in theory though how it will work in practice I don't know. Going to a GP and he says nothing wrong with you that wouldn't be fixed by losing some weight and getting some exercise will feel much better if he prescribes a diet group and a fitness class.

    It might give people the confidence to go rather than just building up the courage to go to a gym and it gives them permission to spend time (and possibly money) on themselves.
     
  13. NelliePledge

    NelliePledge Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I think it could be argued that if funding for community groups hadn’t been squeezed so hard this “medicalised” approach wouldn’t be needed because people would already be getting support without it needing the approval of the NHS.
     
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  14. rvallee

    rvallee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    It's slightly beneficial for healthy people, to a point, and mildly helpful for those with mild health problems. It's otherwise mostly useless.

    Building infrastructure for cheap activities, tax credits for things like gym memberships and social clubs and the like are much better ways of achieving the same. It's social spending, just less effective and more wasteful. It's a very patronizing approach that assumes people need to be told what to do, rather than removing the obstacles, usually financial, that make it hard for them to be active. A culture of work obsession is much more to blame than almost any other factor.

    Other than that it's mostly busywork, the illusion of doing something for the sake of doing something regardless of whether it is useful, which is the very essence of the BPS model. There are much better ways to promote active behavior, much cheaper and more effective. Ironically enough, this is an actual case of "medicalisation" of normal things, which is the very thing deniers of chronic illness think is happening with people with MUS. But if they had the capacity for self-reflection, they wouldn't be doing the things they are currently doing anyway.
     

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