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Wessely gets touchy feely

Discussion in 'PsychoSocial ME/CFS News' started by Estherbot, Nov 4, 2017.

  1. markiemark

    markiemark Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I think Wessely accidentally gave the game away. No wonder psychiatrists get it so wrong if that's their approach to solving problems! Plus it sounds like they get confused between what's pathology and poetry. A bit worrying, really! lol

    What a hilariously pompous remark for him to make :rofl:
     
  2. Inara

    Inara Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I think they have no time for thinking during their studies. They must be excellent at learning from memory - haha, psychiatrists then learn by heart.
     
  3. Inara

    Inara Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    In my opininion that's arrogance at its best. Arrogant people tend to denying anything might be wrong with them or their knowledge. Maybe there's also a bit of narcissm in there...

    We, as humans, cannot know everything. But we can use our curiosity and willingness to understand (and survive) for exploring and discovering what is around us. We can create new things.

    If anybody believes we have already all the technical means to understand everything, he's simply wrong. I'm sure there will come more, and suddenly - lo and beware, what a sight!

    Astrophysicists estimate we can "see" and explore around 4% of the universe. Even if I don't see a justification for this estimation, it could make one humble.
     
  4. Scarecrow

    Scarecrow Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Reading this thread, I'm not sure who thinks this is an original comment from Wessely and who thinks he was quoting someone else.

    His use of quotation marks suggest that it is a word for word quotation from The British Journal of Psychiatry Editorial 'Shrink rethink: rebranding psychiatry' by Jim Crabb, Lee Barber and Neil Masson but the article is paywalled.

    The slide in the tweet below is attributed to a presentation by Lee Barber at a Royal College of Psychiatrists in Scotland meeting last year.


    So I think we should be careful about attributing the remark to Wessely (but he's still an arse for identifying with it).
     
  5. Inara

    Inara Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Hey Bill you could have warned us before posting that pic, what a shock! (But really good, my oh my)
    :couchpotato
     
  6. Sbag

    Sbag Established Member (Voting Rights)

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    It seems that poetry and scientific studies in ME is more prevalent than we thought - I found this "research" article the other day and was flabbergasted the more I flipped through it. I haven't brought myself to actually read it properly because it really isn't worth the energy, but if you want a laugh then have a look and I'd love to see what you all think.
     

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  7. Wonko

    Wonko Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    It has a word in it I don't understand closely followed by the use of the term NLP - I stopped reading at that point.

    *edit - that word was "bricoleur" - which after extensive googling appears to be a french term for someone who doesn't see the point in employing someone actually qualified to do the job.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2017
  8. Sbag

    Sbag Established Member (Voting Rights)

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    It's worth just looking at the rest of the pages to see the number of poems that are included and the diagrams of reflexivity - we have obviously missed this essential element of recovery

    Actually I've just realised a lot of the "poems" are not so - they have just been written to look like they are - still very strange
     
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  9. Sbag

    Sbag Established Member (Voting Rights)

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    The Oxfordshire service that runs this had the following on their website:
    What happens to information about me?
    All information is confidential and secure. Local NHS specialists for CFS/ME are in different teams and therefore information may be shared between services. With your consent, anonymous data from your initial meeting and your repeat 12month follow up form will contribute to an NHS national data set which monitors for quality and good practice. If you would like to know more about this please ask one of the Oxfordshire CFS/ME Service.

    I remember someone asking on another thread about data being shared for something to do with Crawley so hope this is of use.
     
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  10. Trish

    Trish Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I'm afraid it doesn't make me laugh, it makes me feel sick. It's based on a project in my local area (Dorset) that I asked for the data from but they haven't got back to me.

    I think it may have had its origins in Lightning Process. When I was last in touch with the local ME service about 6 years ago the OT in charge there was just getting drawn into LP, so I broke off contact.

    The fact that they use NLP which is part of LP, and talk about it being developed in conjunction with patients who had 'recovered' makes me deeply suspicious and sceptical.

    I don't know whether I have the energy to look deeper, but if that's all that's available in my area, I don't want to be forced into trying it. A bit of me just wants to keep my head down and hope it all goes away when a biomedical test is developed.
     
  11. Inara

    Inara Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I have to accompany @Trish.

    I really tried to laugh.

    I simply cannot.

    ...and thus are god...

    If this is the future...all about impression, imprinting, imagination, phantasies, illusion...and most probably about others' impressions and illusions...I may take the liberty to leave for good.
    (Although imagination can be fun!)
     
  12. Inara

    Inara Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    It's causing pain in my guts :sick:
     
  13. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  14. Adrian

    Adrian Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I think critical thinking and doing well at school can be very different. I do think there is a mentality for a researcher which is to question everything and want to understand. But people who do well at school and university don't need that mentality - it can even hold people back.
     
  15. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Yeah, I think a desire to question and challenge a system can limit ones ability to succeed within it. A lot of bright critical thinkers I was at school with dropped out before even properly completing their exams, particularly if they had tough home lives as well.

    A lot of medical researchers seem to have a weird faith in the systems they're are part of. Respect for claims in peer-reviewed papers, over argument and evidence, seem commonplace. Maybe it's too scary to be producing work that could affect the lives of millions of others if you don't have faith you're a part of a system that will prevent you harming others?
     
  16. Adrian

    Adrian Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    In my world there are malware analysts who ask lots of unconventional questions and quite a few seem to have strange backgrounds and not necessarily degrees etc. Security is another thing where there is a mentality to do it well.
     
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  17. Barry

    Barry Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    When we speak of intelligence, I think there are actually various subsets. Shear IQ alone is not enough if your calling also requires common sense, and you lack it. Such people just seem to resort to arrogance to cover their deficiency.
     
  18. Inara

    Inara Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Honestly, I am not very good at learning from memory, I somehow look at that as some kind of skill.
    But if you want to invent or explore or create something, often mire is needed.

    Most often, I fear.

    Sorry, you don't mean me, right? It's "you" in the meaning of "one/someone"?
     
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  19. TiredSam

    TiredSam Moderator Staff Member

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    That's how I read it - "one". I expect @Barry was trying to avoid sounding like Prince Charles.
     
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  20. Barry

    Barry Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Ye gods, No, of course I didn't mean you :(. It's my non-queen's English. My habit is to to use the vernacular of 'you' rather than 'one'. Sorry for such a misunderstanding.
     
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