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Trial By Error: My Brief Encounter with Professor Crawley

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS News' started by Andy, Nov 20, 2017.

  1. Barry

    Barry Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    In case anyone is confused by your reference to me here. I did briefly post in response to @Estherbot, gently cautioning re doing nothing other than note the connection. I saw on the website his mention of CBT possibly relates mainly to secondary coping strategy support, which would be fine, though I was very pressed for time when I looked. But I also then saw he seems to recommend GET, at which point I deleted my comment.

    My gut feeling is to first consider if he might be more a bewitched disciple than out and out baddy. If that were the case then far better if he could become more enlightened; that might be a very optimistic long shot. But EC is a very bewitching influence I suspect, and I would be very surprised if a number of her followers weren't decent but misguided.
     
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  2. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    ah yes, it's all making more sense now
    upload_2017-11-21_18-27-39.jpeg
     
  3. Estherbot

    Estherbot Established Member (Voting Rights)

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    @Barry Most patients know not to send angry emails, texts or make the wrong type of phone call when tired & emotional. We all have had personal experiences with the people around us.

    The Virology Paine was put right on his errors by David himself & other correspondents. Unlikely he'll be back for more.

    CBT/GET practitioners are obviously getting worried with the current scrutiny.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2017
  4. Liv aka Mrs Sowester

    Liv aka Mrs Sowester Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes @Estherbot he didn't make himself look too clever, did he? The 'wasn't he fired from Berkley?' comment was plain catty.
     
  5. Alvin

    Alvin Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Has anyone invited David Tuller to this forum?
     
  6. Liv aka Mrs Sowester

    Liv aka Mrs Sowester Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, I expect he's bit busy right now but will be along directly :)
     
  7. large donner

    large donner Established Member (Voting Rights)

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    The problem with Crawley is she doesn't understand what the problem is, she goes of on a tangent, but them claims to have solved the problem and doesn't grasp that it has gone wrong.
     
  8. Estherbot

    Estherbot Established Member (Voting Rights)

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    Yes, imagine there is a CBT/GET/LP rumour mill going spreading nonsense about David.
     
  9. Barry

    Barry Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I think she lives in a world where she is right about everything.
     
  10. Inara

    Inara Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    In my area questions were asked in a mean, harsh way. Actually, the questions were meant to show "your results are crap, p*** off". PhD students called it the "shark tank", and in order to be well prepared we thought and asked the wildest questions. Still, it is true that PhD students were treated "more softly" compared to postdocs or professors.

    It's obvious why people react uncomfortably when being asked about their accusations publicly. But for me, it would be mature to answer appropriately.

    Censure is a well-known means to shut out certain opinions, and repeating something over and over again will raise the possibility to cement it as truth, no matter the facts.

    It's unsettling to me.
     
  11. Inara

    Inara Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    In my opinion, the problem started when psychology wanted to become a "natural science". They did - and still do - good field science (e.g. cognitive and behavioral psychology).

    Honestly, I am often reminded of religion, too, when it comes to this topic.
     
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  12. Inara

    Inara Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Our maths professors said that, too: "A well formulated problem is half the solution." It's true.
     
  13. Inara

    Inara Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I would agree that "psychology people" may live in their own reality; it's something I thought after having discussed with people who accept psychological theories (and more) as reality. It seems to me they think people who like science are not very "developed", e.g. spritually; not understanding the human being and its higher purpose. For me, this assumption feels a little arrogant, but well... Maybe they would say the same about me, who knows.

    It reminded me of certain religious groups I know very well from my past. It's very difficult. It's two worlds clashing with each other.

    Everything that would be needed to overcome this is respect; in my opinion.
     
  14. Alvin

    Alvin Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    directly?
     
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  15. Liv aka Mrs Sowester

    Liv aka Mrs Sowester Moderator Staff Member

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    It's a Cornish phrase that is less prompt than it sounds, it means when he get's round to it.
     
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  16. Alvin

    Alvin Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Cool, i've never heard that one before. I recently learned a few Australian ones, spruiking and spitting the dummy.
     
  17. Barry

    Barry Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Funny you should say that ... :rolleyes::).
     
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  18. Arnie Pye

    Arnie Pye Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I remember my husband telling me years ago that him and his British colleagues used to wind up an American colleague at work. They would tell him that they would do something "presently". To a Brit, of course, that means at some indefinite time in the future. But to an American, apparently, doing something "presently" means you will do something immediately. So this guy would expect people to leap into action but they just sat there and continued with what they were doing, and it used to drive him nuts. :)
     
  19. Cheshire

    Cheshire Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  20. ladycatlover

    ladycatlover Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I thought it was "dreckly". ;) I'm not Cornish, but have a friend from Devon... Of course the Devon pronunciation may well be different. :rofl:
     

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