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Selfhacked: 'Dr. Jarred Younger: Cutting Edge Research on CFS, Neuroinflammation, Pain, and Fatigue'

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS News' started by Sasha, Nov 5, 2017.

  1. Sasha

    Sasha Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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  2. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    On the site is a podcast of the interview direct link here:
     
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  3. NelliePledge

    NelliePledge Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Apologies if I’ve misread this

    in the section about leptin he seems to be saying leptin is high but there could be an issue with leptin receptors and people put on weight and low carb is a good way of trying to address this. Then much further on he says that people with ME are thin and have low BP.

    Would the issue be that people have high leptin which makes some lack appetite and become skinny & reduce BP whilst others could have high leptin but receptors are not functioning so they have no satiety and become obese.

    As an overweight person Low carb is working well for me and I can do 16:8 eating pattern without a problem I have no appetite from when I wake until lunchtime. When I do eat any high GI carbs I get noticeably hungrier. I am convinced I have a leptin issue.

    Not discussed with GP or tested of course.

    I am seriously overweight and high BP so don’t fit with his description of ME patients generally but if I have leptin receptor issue that does fit with what he’s saying.


    Had dessert at lunchtime today so brain has been sugarised which leads to increased rambling :confused:
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2017
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  4. Sasha

    Sasha Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Can you break your post up a bit please, @NelliePledge? A lot of us struggle with big blocks of text.
     
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  5. NelliePledge

    NelliePledge Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    QUOTE="Sasha, post: 12953, member: 46"]Can you break your post up a bit please, @NelliePledge? A lot of us struggle with big blocks of text.[/QUOTE]
    Yes sorry it was a bit stream of consciousness thanks to the sugar
     
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  6. Aroa

    Aroa Established Member

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    I think this interwiew was done in 2016, but it is quite interesting.

    Dr. Jarred Younger suggested that higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was related with higher response to LDN.

    Could anyone comment on this ?
     
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  7. ivorin

    ivorin Established Member

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    The whole leptin things seems a bit undefined as of yet.

    I'm skinny, have severe ME and POTS and my leptin is very low.

    Now, he does say the fluctuations are the important factor but I can well recall that the day I took my leptin levels I felt quite bad, so I'm not sure it's a potential marker for more than a subset of us.
     
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  8. Webdog

    Webdog Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Was surprised to read this as well.

    I'm definitely an LDN responder, yet my ESR (last measured 6 years ago) is only 5mm/hr, not the "over 40mm/hr" Younger says predicts response.

    Perhaps those with lower ESR need more LDN to get a response, if they tolerate it? I need 9mg/day LDN.

    According to my HMO, the standard ESR range is 0-15mm/hr.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2017
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