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Esther Crawley - what drives her

Discussion in 'PsychoSocial ME/CFS News' started by Sly Saint, Nov 20, 2017.

  1. Sly Saint

    Sly Saint Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Well, I've removed the question mark from the thread title.........It was actually meant as an intro to the piece she wrote........not as an actual question.
    (We really need a 'rhetorical' emoji):muted:

    eta: did everyone who commented actually read the article?
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2017
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  2. Skycloud

    Skycloud Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Maybe my perception is a skewed but...

    My concern is the danger of playing the man and not the ball. We want to have and keep possession of the ball, and we don't want to be benched. (Pwme have been benched for a decades.) The judgement of that can be a fine line and is based on perception.

    I have some idea of where the line is for me personally, and I have to reign it in every time I feel provoked but I don't know where it should be for the community. And who get's to say anyway.

    I think it's an important issue though because we haven't won the game yet.
     
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  3. Liv aka Mrs Sowester

    Liv aka Mrs Sowester Moderator Staff Member

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    Have we collated Crawley quotes and interviews anywhere yet?
    It might be useful to do that in this thread. Her motivation in her own words rather than our armchair psychologising (which is fun, but ultimately pointless).
     
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  4. Luther Blissett

    Luther Blissett Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I noticed that she keeps saying Chronic Fatigue, and thinks that parents of children in deprivation have iPhones on which to chart progress.

    That and the commitment to sleep deprivation for all patients.

    It's obvious that she thinks that me/cfs is on a spectrum which goes

    Fatigue>Chronic Fatigue>me/cfs.
     
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  5. Skycloud

    Skycloud Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Sorry SlySaint, I was writing my post in response to the discussion as it had developed when you posted.


    My take away from the article was that she noticed a real need; that children with ME need help and lack appropriate specialist services.

    This is true.

    She may have tripped over something useful in that some teenagers who experience fatigue because they sleep too much respond well to the sleep therapy she offers.

    That's me with my Pollyanna glasses on.
     
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  6. Alvin

    Alvin Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    well played :laugh:
     
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  7. Inara

    Inara Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Only a side comment:
    In my opinion, in order to know or understand one's actions it is mandatory to understand the motive. As Sun Tzu put it "know your enemy and know yourself and you won't have to worry about the outcome" (for which he proposed spies), or for those who like Game of Thrones (I know, it's only fantasy): "Sometimes when I try to understand a person's motives, I play a little game. I assume the worst. What's the worst reason they could possibly have for saying what they say and doing what they do? Then I ask myself, 'How well does that reason explain what they say and what they do?'" (Littlefinger)

    By the way, how would you differentiate between motive and intent, I mean not only by words?

    Not necessarily. A psychopath has his agenda - could you speak of motive when no feelings are present?

    (Not saying Crawley is a psychopath!)

    I guess a human being always has some kind of motive. Unless he's a robot or a servant without own will, or certain parts of the brain are missing or injured...so most often it is reasonable to wonder about motives.
     
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  8. Wonko

    Wonko Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Is the motive relevant, or is it a distraction?

    How would knowing her motive(s) help us?
     
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  9. Valentijn

    Valentijn Moderator Staff Member

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    Motive is the reason for doing something. Intent simply means the action was volitional - that someone wasn't forced to do something against their will, involuntarily intoxicated, etc.
     
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  10. Inara

    Inara Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    @Valentijn,
    Okay.

    But isn't behind an intent a motive?

    I personally think "motive" is major in a human being and his actions.

    I won't say that an interviewee in a magazine would be comlpetely honest about one's motives. It looks good to say, if "I knew I only had five minutes left, I would hope to say, 'At least I did make a difference to kids with chronic fatigue'" - she most certainly has for now, in which direction might be part of a discussion. I am also very sure this is not what she might think during her last breaths; at least if it's true what people tell about "their last minutes". So, again, one is left with speculation.

    Not words count, I would say, but actions and its fruits. This is very telling. And a look into the eyes sometimes.

    My feeling is a "the poor victim"-game is played, plus "see, we're the good ones"-game. That's what I see - Tuller's blog, other articles and this one, too. There is a certain difference between what is said and what happens in reality...
     
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  11. Alvin

    Alvin Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I agree, when dealing with power imbalances one has to know how to play the game better then the powerful abuser.

    It may, its best to understand your enemy when possible because it can lead to more effective strategies.
    In our case we can understand her motivation and attack it directly or we can find a disease mechanism or treatment which will make her reasons not matter.
     
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