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Discriminative value of cardiopulmonary progressive exercise test in mitochondrial myopathy and chronic fatigue syndrome

Discussion in 'BioMedical ME/CFS Research' started by strategist, Nov 22, 2017.

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  1. strategist

    strategist Established Member (Voting Rights)

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    Discriminative value of cardiopulmonary progressive exercise test in mitochondrial myopathy and chronic fatigue syndrome

    https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/8a0e/7ca972959fbf217a50b4c6a3a5f35bf90e74.pdf

    I did not read it all but looked for evidence for or against the deconditioning hypothesis. The authors appear to believe that deconditioning cannot explain the results of CFS patients.

     
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  2. Sasha

    Sasha Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Thanks for posting! :)

    I've broken that up a bit for readability and have left it unquoted to avoid reducing the font size:

    In patients with CFS, it has been hypothesized that physical deconditioning plays a role in fatigue maintenance, since it is possible that the tendency towards hypovolemia, by reduction of venomotor tone and the depletion of salt, collaborates with the reduction in oxygen consumption to affect cardiac output (6).

    However, in our study, there was no significant difference between control subjects and both groups of patients in oxygen pulse (table 3), so the results found cannot be explained by differences in physical condition.

    What is the exercise limiting factor in CSF? We observed that the peak HR of the MM and CFS groups is significantly lower than that of controls, without differences in basal HR between them.

    The HR slope or slope with which heart rate increases is, on the other hand, significantly superior in the CFS group with respect to the two remaining comparative groups. De BP et al. (5) also reported significantly lower peak HR in CFS patients in compare with control subjects.

    These authors hypothesized that a lower peak HR as a consequence of a slow acceleration in response to exercise. In according to our results, this conclusion may be incorrect because of they did not measured the HR slope.

    We suggested that an excessive tachycardization in response to exercise provokes early fatigue and it is the exercise limiting factor in CSF.​
     
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  3. Sean

    Sean Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Bold claim, especially about causal direction.
     
  4. Sasha

    Sasha Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I agree - what's causing the tachycardia?
     
  5. arewenearlythereyet

    arewenearlythereyet Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    My tachycardia is controlled by taking potassium and magnesium. I think this may have something to do with OI issues?
     
  6. Jenny TipsforME

    Jenny TipsforME Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    But the ME fatigue doesn’t simply go by controlling the tachycardia, in my experience. POTS fatigue does but that is more immediate and feels different (though this could be what they’re picking up).

    I agree that there’s something going on re heart rate and ME. It is helpful to reduce tachycardia.
     
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